Department of Sociology/Social Work and Criminal Justice

Stephen Stokes, Department Chair
Department Office: Clarke 344
Department Phone: (208) 356-1363
Office Manager: Donna Seeber
Department Faculty: Steve Hay, Don Jensen, Jack Reinwand, Stephen Smith, Mike Tatum, Grover Wray

The mission of the Department of Sociology, Social Work and Criminal Justice is twofold: 1. To help General Education students be exposed to and gain an appreciation for social and cultural influences that pertain to themselves, family and society. 2. To prepare students for advanced study and eventual careers in the fields of Sociology, Social Work and Criminal Justice.

In addition, the department, has the following objectives: 1. Support the General Mission Statement of BYU-Idaho. 2. Provide majors with a quality preparatory educational foundation for transfer and advanced study in the disciplines of Sociology, Social Work, Criminal Justice and Anthropology. (e.g. Develop content, knowledge, values and skills related to society, culture, the social environment, social justice, and successful human interaction and functioning.) 3. Nurture a lifelong desire to learn, develop professional behavior, and to be of service to others as a contributing citizen.

The Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Criminal Justice is concerned with the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Subject matter ranges from the immediate family to the hostile mob, from crime to religion, and from the divisions of race and social class to the shared beliefs of a common culture.

Sociology explores social life and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Sociologists study people, their organizations, and their cultures. The organizations include families, tribes, communities, and societies, along with a variety of social, religious, political, and business institutions. The study of culture examines language, beliefs, and knowledge in societies. Selected sociology courses are also helpful to students majoring in the related fields of political science, social work, and pre-law.

Career Opportunities

An Associate Degree in general Sociology is directed toward preparing students for higher education with eventual careers in teaching, organizational development, or research. Sociology prepares students to better understand themselves and the world around them.

Careers in Criminal Justice grow naturally out of the consideration of social relationships. Individuals of the highest caliber are sought for this vocation. They are evaluated on the basis of academic achievement, personal integrity, physical fitness and personal appearance. Careers may include employment with law enforcement agencies at the state, local, or federal level; with the courts as paralegals or attorneys; or in corrections, probation or parole. Opportunities also exist in military and in private security.

A major in Social Work will address the needs of the student planning to work directly in “helping people”. Social Case Worker, Delinquency Case Worker, Mental Health Worker, and Children’s Services Worker are some of the career options available to students who plan to transfer into a Bachelor’s program.

The Department also offers a limited number of courses in Anthropology, the study of humankind everywhere and throughout time. These courses are designed to expand the students understanding of themselves especially in relationship to other cultures and ideas.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS

Associate in Arts and Sciences with a major in Sociology (252)

Requirements for a major (15 hours)

1.  Complete the following course:
Soc 111  Introduction to Sociology

2.  Complete any four of the following courses:    
Anth 101 Introduction to Cul Anthro   Soc 112 Social Problems
Soc  311 or SW 311 Family Interaction 
Soc  323 Race and Ethnic Relations
Soc  451 Self and Society 
Soc  357 Human Relations & Leadership  
Soc  383 Juvenile Delinquincy 
Soc  350 or Psych 350 Social Psych 
*Soc 340 or SW 340 Res Meth & Anal 
*Soc 341 or SW 341 Stat Analysis Lab  
*Must be taken together. Must have competed Math 101. See course descriptions for details.
3.  Complete all General Education requirements.  
Refer to the General Education section of this catalog for    
complete details.
Minor Sociology

Requirements for a minor (18 hours)

1.  Complete the following courses:
Soc 111 Introduction to Sociology
Soc 112 Social Problems
Soc 403 Social Theory

2.  Complete 3 of the following courses:
Anth 101 Introduction to Cul Anthro   
Soc 311 or SW 311 Family Interaction 
Soc 323 Race and Ethnic Relations
Soc 451 Self and Society 
Soc 357 Human Relations & Leadership  
Soc 383 Juvenile Delinquency 
Soc 350 or Psych 350 Social Psych
*Soc 340 or SW 340 Res Meth & Anal 
*Soc 341 or SW 341 Stat Anal Lab

*Must be taken together
Must have completed Math 101 See course descriptions for details.

3.  Complete all General Education requirements.  
Refer to the General Education section of this catalog for    
complete details.
Associate in Arts and Sciences with a major in Social Work (250)

Requirements for a major (18 hours)

1.  Complete the following courses:
Soc 111 Introduction to Sociology (for most transfer schools)
or 
Soc 112 Social Problems (required at BYU-Provo)
SW 360 Introduction to Social Work 

2.  Complete two of the following courses:
SW 362 Social Service Practice I
SW 367 Human Behav in Social Envir

3.  Complete two of the following courses:
Soc  311 or SW 311 Family Interaction
Soc  323 Race and Ethnic Relations
Soc  451 Self and Society 
Soc  383 Juvenile Delinquency
Soc  350 or Psych 350 Social Psych
*Soc 340 or SW 340 Res Me & Ana 
*Soc 341 or SW 341 Statis Ana Lab

*Must be taken together
Must have completed Math 101

Note: For those who will transfer to       
another college or university to complete a 
bachelors degree, when making choices for the 
classes listed above, you should understand 
the specific Social Work requirements of the 
university or college you plan to attend after 
leaving BYU-Idaho.

Note on Field Experience: 
SW 466R Senior Field Experience is available to 
Social Work majors as elective credit. Check with 
your advisor or the class instructor.

4.  Complete all General Education requirements.  
Refer to the General Education section of this catalog for    
complete details. You are also encouraged to follow the 
suggestions given below as you complete some general 
education requirements.

We recommend that you include the following as you fill 
the GE requirements or take elective credits.
BIO 264 Anatomy & Physiology I
BIO 265 Anatomy & Physiology II
PolSc 311 State & Local Government 
Psych 111 General Psychology

Associate in Arts and Sciences with a major in: Criminal Justice

Requirements for a major (17 to 18 hours)

1.  Complete the following courses:
Soc 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice 
Soc 202 Penal Laws
Soc 220 Politics in American Society
or
Soc 303 Criminal Procedures

2.  Complete two of the following courses:
BIO 351 Principles Wildlife Mgmt 
HS 460 Use & Abuse Drugs 
PolSc 111 State & Local Government 
Psych 111 General Psychology
Psych 242 Abnormal Psychology
Soc 205 Criminal Investigations
Soc 323 Race and Ethnic Relations
Soc 357 Human Relations& Leadership 
Soc 383 Juvenile Delinquency
Soc 440 Corrections 

3.  Complete all General Education requirements.  
Refer to the General Education section of this catalog for    
complete details.

NOTE: A composite Social Science Eduction 
degree will be offered. Please refer to the 
History Department catalog section for the requirements 
to obtain this degree.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Sociology and Social Work

Soc 111* Introduction to Sociology (3:3:0)
This course focuses on the social and cultural foundations of human life. Its basic concepts enable the students to appreciate the degree to which they and others are molded and shaped by society, and to understand the complexity of the social forces in their environment.

Soc 112* Social Problems (3:3:0)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with current social problems and suggests possible means of prevention and/or solution. Examples of possible study areas are population, poverty, crime, family breakup, suicide, war, extremism, racial problems, mental illness, etc.

Soc 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3:3:0)
The philosophy and history of criminal justice, overview of crime and police problems; organization and functions of law enforcement, courts, probation, pardon and parole. Survey of professional career opportunities and qualifications required.

Soc 202 Penal Codes (3:3:0)
Elements of criminal law. Analysis of police power, civil rights, case law, and statutory definitions.

Soc 203 Campus Officer Training (2:2:0)
This course provides students with a basic understanding of essential job duties and functions of campus officers. The course is outlined by the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators, a certificate of completion is issued. This course is required of students before working at Campus Police.

Soc 205 Criminal Investigations (3:3:0)
Techniques and practices of criminal investigation, scientific crime detection, interview and interrogation techniques. Laws of arrest, search and seizure. Crime scene search, evidence collection and preservation.

Soc 206 Police in American Society (3:3:0)
Role of enforcement in our society. Analysis of police procedures and practices. Patrol methods and techniques.

Soc 290R Special Topics in Criminal Justice (1-3:TBA:0)
The department will determine special areas of study that will benefit criminal justice students in giving them additional preparation related to the field. Term of enrollment, credit and other details will be arranged by the department and the instructor.

Soc 298 Work Experience in Criminal Justice (3:3:0)
(Internship)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
Insurance Fee: $21
Three hours per week per credit hour May be repeated for credit Supervised work and project experience for the purpose of increasing student understanding of problems and procedures of criminal justice.

Soc 301 Administration of Justice (3:3:0)
Purpose, function, and history of the courts, dealing with the administration of justice, survey of criminal procedure, and rules of evidence. A case studies approach will be used.

Soc 303 Criminal Procedures (3:3:0)
This course examines case law as it relates to constitutional liberties or court order procedures.

Soc 311 or SW 311 Family Interaction (3:3:0)
Analyzes the effect of modern American society on successful marriage. Family roles such as father, mother, child, adolescent, and aged are examined in connection with the problems each faces in modern society.

Soc 323 Race and Ethnic Relations (3:3:0)
This course considers historic as well as present day relationships of racial and ethnic groups. The students analyzes prejudices and discriminatory practices, their causes and influences.

Soc 340 or SW 340**Research Methods & Statistical Analysis (4:4:0)
Prerequisite:Math 101
Qualitative and quantitative designs. Problem formulation, data collection, statistical analysis, writing, and presenting results.
**This course must be taken with Soc 341 or SW 341

Soc 341 or SW 341** Statistical Analysis Lab (1:0:1)
Use of computers and statistical package SPSS in data analysis.
**This course must be taken with Soc 340 or SW 340

Soc 350 Social Psychology (3:3:0)
An in-depth view of the psychology of the inner person and what it means to be human. The emphasis is on the complex interplay between the individual and society in the formation of self concept, attitudes, and the way in which he/she perceives others.
Students may receive Psych 350 credit or Soc 350 but not both.

Soc 357 Human Relations and Leadership (3:3:0)
The basic knowledge and skills necessary to lead and participate effectively in small groups are presented. Leadership Skills are enhanced through understanding self, interpersonal relations, and small groups. Students are expected to participate in small group experiences.

Soc 383 Juvenile Delinquency (3:3:0)
The nature, extent, causes, treatment and prevention of delinquency as well as the adjudication process will be considered. Social causes and solutions are emphasized.

Soc 403 Sociological Theory (3:3:0)
Survey and appraisal of major schools of sociological thought at present, with an examination of areas of change and controversy emphasizing recent significant sociological contributions.

Soc 440 Corrections (3:3:0)
An overview and critical analysis of contemporary correctional theory and practice. Historical, traditional, innovative, and future aspects of corrections as well as critical issues such as prisoners’ rights, death penalty, unions, and institutions, and correctional careers will be discussed.

Soc 451 Self and Society (3:3:0)
One workshop required
Supplies Fee: $9
Theories of developmental social influences upon the self; self-concept analysis, changing self image and personal life skill. All are topics of consideration for the student of self-concept.

Soc 460 Urban Sociology (3:3:0)
The changing nature of social life as it has moved from predominantly rural to urban patterns. Significant events that have led to urbanization.

Soc 490R Special Topics in Sociology (3:3:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
The department will determine special areas of study that will benefit the Sociology students in giving them additional preparation related to the field. Term of enrollment, credit and other details will be arranged by the Department and the instructor.

Soc 498 Work Experience in Sociology (3:3:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
Insurance Fee: $21
Students will be guided and directed in a practical sociological experience by a faculty member.

SW 311 or Soc 311 Family Interaction (3:3:0)
Analyzes the effect of modern American society on successful marriage. Family roles such as father, mother, child, adolescent, and aged are examined in connection with the problems each faces in modern society.

SW 360 Introduction to Social Work (3:3:0)
Social welfare as a social institution and the emergence of social work as a profession with its various fields of practice.

SW 362 Social Service Practice I Individuals (3:3:0)
Methods of social work practice; small group process as an agent for change and growth; task groups, therapy groups, and families as targets for change.

SW 367 Human Behavior in Social Environment (3:3:0)
This course introduces social works’ perspective on human behavior and the social environment. Life span development within the context of human and social systems theory are studied

SW 490R Special Topics (3:3:0)
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
The department will determine special areas of study that will benefit Criminal Justice students in giving them additional preparation related to the field. Term of enrollment, credit and other details will be arranged by the department and the instructor.

Anthropology

Anthro 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3:3:0)
Anthropological approaches and perspectives on humans, their culture, and their society; early and prehistoric humans. Basic concepts for analyzing cultural behavior. Comparison of non Western with Western societies.

Anth 310 Culture and Gender (3:3:0)
This course studies the complex interplay between culture and its impact on psychological concepts. Students may receive credit for either Anthro 310 or Psych 310 but not both.

Anthro 340-350 People and Cultures of the World (3:3:0)
A comprehensive examination of selected peoples and cultures of the world. Topics ranging from geographical/historical roots to modern social and economic patterns, including art, political systems, social organizations, family structure and religious practices will be studied. The numbered courses focus on different areas of the world and will be taught on a rotating basis. Please check the current class schedule for course offerings.

Anthro 340 Special Topics
Anthro 341 People & Culture of Japan
Anthro 342 People & Culture of Russia
Anthro 343 People & Culture of East Eur
Anthro 344 People & Culture of West Eur
Anthro 345 People & Culture of China
Anthro 346 People & Culture of Pac Is
Anthro 347 People & Culture of Nat Am
Anthro 348 People & Culture of Mid Ea
Anthro 349 People & Culture of Africa
Anthro 350 People & Culture of Lat Am

Anth 380 Family and Culture (3:3:0)
This course will investigate the role of culture in all major aspects of family life, as well as analyze the history of the Western family and gender relations. Students will be made aware of the diversity of family structure and function in the global community. Students may not receive credit for more than one of the following courses: Fam 380, Honors 207E or Anthro 380


Complete General Education listing

Credit Hour Designations/Abbreviations (e.g., 3:3:3)


BYU-Idaho | Catalog