Department of Mechanical Engineering & Technology
Department Chair: Adrian Baird
Department Secretary: Kenna Carter (208) 496-1862
Department Faculty: Adrian BairdLeo CastagnoBill CooleyAlan DutsonVic ForsnesDavid JohnsonDale LarsenDale MortensenDavid Saunders

 
Department of Mechanical Engineering & Technology
Engineering and Engineering Technology are exciting majors which offer professional job satisfaction, high salary, and excellent placement potential.

The Mechanical Engineering & Technology department has four programs from which to select a career path. These are
  • Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (470)
  • Associate of Applied Science in Engineering (058)
  • Associate of Applied Science in Engineering Technology with emphasis in Design, Manufacturing, or Welding (341)
  • Associate of Applied Science in Welding Engineering Technology (110)

    Students will be assigned any one of the three semester tracks when choosing Mechanical Engineering or Engineering as a major. The Engineering Technology and Welding Engineering Technology programs are only available on the fall/winter track. Special BYU-Idaho admission criteria apply to the Welding Engineering Technology and Engineering Technology majors. Check with department faculty advisors for specifics.

    The Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Technology programs are designed for accreditation through the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). Students entering into either one of these programs can expect a well designed and rigorous curriculum based upon ABET criteria and industry standards. The Welding Engineering Technology is a very rigorous program designed for certification. Certification criteria are based on the requirements of the American Welding Society (AWS).

    Each program will train and develop the skills necessary for employment in the specific field of endeavor upon graduation. Student certification within a specific engineering technology discipline or passing the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam is strongly encouraged. Using learned techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools, graduates will be expected to demonstrate their abilities to apply mathematics, science, engineering, and technology principles necessary for solving engineering problems. They must be able to communicate effectively through writing and oral presentation. Graduates will gain an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility. Additionally, students should develop an understanding that education is a life long process.

    Math and science are critical components of an engineering and engineering technology curriculum. The normal entry level mathematic class for Mechanical Engineering and Engineering programs is Math 112 Calculus I. For the Engineering Technology and Welding Engineering Technology majors the entry level math course is Math 110 College Algebra. Entering students must check with their advisor to ensure they are beginning at the correct level of math. Students with weak math skills will be advised to begin with a lower math course to bring their skills up.

    The prerequisites for enrollment in the Math 112 Calculus I course are:
  • three years of high school mathematics, including geometry, two years of algebra, and trigonometry coursework (or completion of Math 110 and Math 111).
  • experience with mathematical topics of exponentials, logarithms, matrices, and systems of linear equations.

    The prerequisites for enrollment in the Math 110 College Algebra course are:
  • two years of high school algebra
    or
  • a "B" grade or higher in Math 101

    For engineering students the normal entry level chemistry class is Chem 105: General Chemistry. The prerequisites for Chem 105 are concurrent enrollment in or completion of Math 110 (or high school equivalent) and completion of high school chemistry (or Chem 101). Inadequately prepared students in chemistry should take Chem 101 and (if needed) Math 110.

    Students should consult their advisor within the Mechanical Engineering & Technology department concerning classes appropriate for their study at BYU-Idaho. High school preparation, area of interest in engineering or technology, and the intended program are factors which will be used to tailor the program to the needs of the individual student. Remedial course work for students with inadequate high school preparation and achievement is also available.


     
  • Program Description


     
    B.S.  in Mechanical Engineering (470)   
    A very successful associate degree in engineering has been converted into a specialized baccalaureate degree program in mechanical engineering at BYU-Idaho. Junior and senior level courses for the Bachelor of Science degree are being offered in fall semester of 2003. Entering freshman should begin their term with the Math 112 Calculus I course (unless otherwise advised by the faculty).

    General Education Requirements

    As you fill the General Education and University requirements, take the classes listed below and then go to the General Education section for a complete listing of the requirements.
     
    Requirement 1:

    Take these Courses    
    CHEM 105
    ENG 316
    HUM 201, 202
     
    AND
    Students needing Math 110 must continue with Option B from the major requirement list. Students ready for Math 112 should continue with Option A from the major requirement list.
    Take 1 Course    
    MATH 110, 112

     
    AND
    Requirement 2:

    Take this Course    
    CS 144

     
    Major Requirements
       
    Requirement 1:
    No double-counting of major courses.
    Take these Courses    Min Grade: C
    COMPE 305
    ME 100, 131, 131L, 132, 132L, 172, 204, 217, 218, 242, 250, 315, 322, 360, 370, 423, 424, 480, 482
    PH 123, 220
     
    AND
    Take 1 Course    Min Grade: C
    ME 298, 361, 398, 440, 450, 470, 498
     
    AND
    Take 2 Courses    Min Grade: C
    ME 361, 440, 450, 470

     
    AND
    Requirement 2:
    Choose 1 option:
    Option A (preferred option)
    Take these Courses    Min Grade: C
    MATH 215, 316
     
            AND
               Take 1 Course    Min Grade: C
               MATH 221, 321, 411, 472
     
            OR
               Option B
               Take these Courses    Min Grade: C
               MATH 111, 112, 215, 316


     
    A.A.S.  in Engineering (351)   
    The Engineering (058) program offers students the first two years of an engineering curriculum. Upon completion students may opt to either transfer to another four year university engineering program or enter the baccalarueate Mechanical Engineering program (470) at Brigham Young University - Idaho.

    Basic Education Requirements

    As you fill the Basic Education Requirements and University requirements, take the classes listed below and then go to the Basic Education section for a complete listing of the requirements.
     
    Take these Courses    
    AMHER 170
    ENG 316
     
    AND
    Students needing Math 110 must continue with Option C in the major requirement list. Students ready for Math 112 may select Options A or B in the major requirement list.
    Take 1 Course    
    MATH 110, 112
     
    Major Requirements
       
    Requirement 1:

    Take these Courses    
    CHEM 105
    CS 144
    ME 100, 131, 131L, 132, 132L, 172, 204, 217, 218, 242, 250
    PH 123, 220

     
    AND
    Requirement 2:
    Choose one option.
    Option A

    Math 113, 214, 371 must be taken and 1 additional course from this group to complete this option. (This option is for students who desire to transfer to another university.)
    Take 12 Credits    Min Grade: C
    MATH 113, 214, 221, 321, 341, 371, 411, 472
     
            OR
               Option B
               
               Math 215, 316 must be taken and 1 additional course from this group to complete this option.
               Take 11 Credits    Min Grade: C
               MATH 215, 221, 316, 321, 411, 472
     
                      OR
                         Option C
                         Take these Courses    Min Grade: C
                         MATH 111, 112, 215, 316


     
    A.A.S.  in Engineering Technology (352)   
    The Engineering Technology program allows for combination of classes between the career paths to make up the student's overall program. Specific career paths allow students to select a field of endeavor that interests them. Students are required to complete an integrated core of course work, and then focus on a career path based on their choice and faculty advising. These career paths currently are:
  • Design & Drafting
  • Manufacturing
  • Welding

    The Engineering Technology core classes provide for integration of engineering and technology students in a classroom and lab setting that simulates on-the-job experience. Upon completion of the chosen career path, graduates are strongly encouraged to take and pass a professional certification exam offered through a number of national professional organizations. These organizations include American Design and Drafting Association (ADDA) and Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME). Graduates can enter a baccalaureate program (such as Technology Management) at BYU-Idaho, transfer to another university, or enter the workforce.

  • Basic Education Requirements

    As you fill the Basic Education Requirements and University requirements, take the classes listed below and then go to the Basic Education section for a complete listing of the requirements.
     
    Take 1 Course    Min Grade: C
    MATH 108, 110
     
    Major Requirements
       
    Requirement 1:

    Take these Courses    Min Grade: C
    ENGRT 110, 216
    MATH 111
    ME 100, 131, 131L, 172, 480
    PH 105, 105L
     
    AND
    Take 1 Course    
    MATH 112, 221
     
    AND
    Please check with facutly advisor for specific career path requirements.
    Take 18 Credits    Min Grade: C
    ART 110, 115, 130, 240
    B 247, 283, 370
    ENGRT 115, 125, 211, 231, 234, 236, 238, 252
    ME 132, 132L, 211, 250, 298
    WELD 105, 110, 117, 123, 225, 229, 256, 258, 280

     
    AND
    Requirement 2:
    Students choosing any of the following courses must take them together:
    BIO 100 & 102
    BIO 150 & 150L
    BIO 221 & 222
    Take 4 Credits    Min Grade: C
    BIO 100, 102, 118, 120, 130, 150, 150L, 176, 200, 202, 208, 221, 222, 250, 264, 302


     
    A.A.S.  in Welding Engineering Technology (360)   
    The Welding Engineering Technology major provides training in-depth in welding processes. Students are taught to recognize, perform, and access welding processes. The welding curriculum includes welding theory and computer-aided processes (robotic welding). Students needing remedial help should talk to their department faculty advisor.

    Basic Education Requirements

    As you fill the Basic Education Requirements and University requirements, take the classes listed below and then go to the Basic Education section for a complete listing of the requirements.
     
    Take 1 Course    
    MATH 108, 110
     
    Major Requirements
       
    Take these Courses    
    CHEM 105
    MATH 111
    ME 172, 250
    PH 105, 105L
    WELD 105, 110, 117, 123, 225, 229, 256, 258, 280
     
    AND
    Take 1 Course    
    MATH 112, 221
     
    Course Descriptions

    ENGRT 110 Joining Processes (3:2:6)
    A course in joining processes that includes welding, standard fasteners (nuts,bolts), non-standard fasteners (inserts, blind fasteners), adhesives, foam tapes and epoxies and other processes.
     
    ENGRT 125 Printed Circuit Board Design Layout (3:2:2)
    An introductory course covering the fundamental principles of computer aided design and printed circuit board layout and manufacture. Product design is emphasized. Projects include sheet metal layout, CNC layout, and chemical processes.
     
    ENGRT 211 Machine and Tool Layout Fundamentals (3:2:2)
    Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ME 172, EngrT 115
    Introduction to presentation drawings; belt, gears, and cams; sheet metal layout; structure steel, electrical and electronics layout; jigs and fixtures; tool design drawings. All design work is done with 3D Parametric CAD tools.
     
    ENGRT 216 Statics and Strength of Materials (4:4:0)
    Prerequisite: Math 111 or equivalent; consent of instructor.
    Application of the principles of statics to machine design and structural engineering problems includes forces, moments and couples, static equilibrium of force systems, free body diagrams, friction, elementary strength of materials, stress, strain, torsion, shear, bending moment, stresses and deflections in beams, pressure vessels, stress concentrations, equations of elasticity, combined loading, mohris circle and columns. (Primarily for technology students and architecture and construction management majors).
     
    ENGRT 231 Tool Design (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: ME 172, ME 131
    Design and evaluation of jigs and fixtures for manufacturing processes. Introduction to design concepts of pressworking tools. (F)
     
    ENGRT 234 Computer Numerical Control (3:3:3)
    Prerequisite: ME 131 & 132, Math 110 & 111
    Automated machine control through Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) and Computer Numerical Control (CNC) are main emphasis; brief introduction to Automated Program Tools (APT). Students gain practical laboratory experience on CAM and CNC software and equipment.
     
    ENGRT 236 Hydraulics and Pneumatics (3:3:0)
    A study of the fundamental principles governing the transmission and control of fluid power (hydraulic and pneumatics). Includes a study of the basic components of hydraulic and pneumatic systems and circuits.
     
    ENGRT 238 Product Design Customization (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: EngrT 115, ME 172, EngrT 211
    A study of product design and customization using advanced CAD and CAM applications. Topics include advanced solids modeling, menu customization, and customized software programming. Students will be working as team members in the resolution of design problems.
     
    ENGRT 252 Quality Control (3:3:0)
    Fundamental quality control concepts; quality concepts and problem solving techniques associated with statistical process control Emphasis placed on statistical methods. Computer software used for data analysis and presentations.
     
    ME 100 Career Explorations in Engineering & Technology (1:1:0)
    Introduction to the professions of engineering and technology; detailed investigation of the curricula; transfer to four-year schools; fields of engineering and technology; job opportunities and placement; career planning; personal management skills, engineering case studies; ethics, student multimedia presentations, guest speakers. (F or W)
     
    ME 131 Design & Manufacturing (3:3:2)
    Integration of manufacturing and engineering design. Emphasis on principles of chip formation and processes, machining parameters,measurement, material selection and basic heat treating.
     
    ME 131L Lab (0:0:3)
    Lab for ME 131.
     
    ME 132 Design Analysis Application (3:3:2)
    Prerequisite: ME 131 or consent of Instructor.
    Continuation of integration of manufacturing and engineering design. Introduction to the engineering design process through the development of industry related engineering projects. In depth instruction on manufacturing processes including CAD/CAM.
     
    ME 132L Lab (1:0:2)
    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ME 132.
    Lab for ME 132.
     
    ME 172 Visualization in Engineering (3:2:2)
    Prerequisite: Three hours of instruction per week
    Fundamentals of 3D engineering drawing principles, geometric construction techniques, orthographic and axonometric projection, section views, descriptive geometry, industrial drafting standards, fits and tolerances, and geometric dimensioning and tolerancing.
     
    ME 204 Engineering Mechanics-Dynamics (3:3:2)
    Prerequisite: ME 217, Math 112 or consent of Instructor
    The study and application of the concepts of dynamics to particles, systems of particles, rigid bodies, and vibrating systems of particles. Vector analysis used.
     
    ME 211 Elementary Surveying (3:2:4)
    Prerequisite: Math 111 and ME 172
    Theory and use of instruments dealing with measurements pertaining to plane surveying. Application of surveying methods of practical problems. (F)
     
    ME 218 Materials Lab (1:0:3)
    Prerequisite: Concurrent or prior completion of ME 217 and/or ME 250.
    Laboratory investigations in materials science and strength of material.
     
    ME 242 Numerical Methods (3:3:1)
    Introduction to programming and numerical analysis applied to engineering and design problems.
     
    ME 250 Engineering Materials (3:3:1)
    Prerequisite: Prerequisites or co-requisites: Chemistry 105, Math 215.
    Microstructure of engineering materials, including metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites. Factors influencing the selection of materials in engineering analysis and design.
     
    ME 298 Mechanical Engineering Internship (1-4:0:0)
    Prerequisite: Consent of Department Chair.
    Industrial work experience in Mechanical Engineering.
     
    ME 315 Dynamic Systems and Instrumentation (3:3:2)
    Prerequisite: Math 316, ME 204, PH 220
    Methods of mechanical engineering measurement systems, devices, and data recording and analysis. Dynamic response modeling and analysis of mechanical, electrical, fluid, and combined systems.
     
    ME 322 Thermal Systems Analysis and Design (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Math 215
    Fundamentals of classical thermodynamics. Thermodynamic property relationships for ideal gasses, vapors, liquids and solids. First and second law analysis of open and closed systems. Irreversibility and availability analysis. Energy and entropy concepts in power and refrigeration cycles.
     
    ME 360 Fluid Mechanics (3:3:2)
    Prerequisite: Math 316, PH 123, ME 204
    Physics and mathematical modeling of incompressible fluid flow. Conservation principles in engineering systems involving fluids; inviscid and viscous flow models. Fluid machinery.
     
    ME 361 Fluid Mechanics II (3:3:2)
    Prerequisite: ME 360
    One-dimensional compressible fluid flow models. Shock wave phenomena. Experimental measurements in fluid dynamic devices and systems.
     
    ME 370 Mechanical Systems Design (3:3:2)
    Prerequisite: ME 172, 204, 217 & 250
    Analysis, modeling and design of mechanical components and sytems, materials, processes and structural analysis, static and dynamic failure theories, analysis and design of machine elements. Use of computer-aided design tools emphasized.
     
    ME 423 Heat Transfer (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Math 316, ME 322, PH 123
    Heat transfer models for conduction, convection, and radiant energy transfer. Design of systems involving heat, mass, and momentum transfer.
     
    ME 424 Energy Analysis Lab (1:0:3)
    Prerequisite: ME 322 and concurrent enrollment in ME 423.
    Laboratory experience analysing thermodynamic and heat transfer systems.
     
    ME 440 Transport Phenomena (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Math 316; ME 322; ME 360; ME 423; PH 123
    Intermediate problem-solving and engineering models of combined heat, mass, and momentum transfer. Applications to mechanical, thermal, and propulsion systems.
     
    ME 450 Introduction to Environmental Engineering (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Math 215; Chem 105
    Engineering modeling of environmental topics, including heat and mass transfer; environmental chemistry; water quality and management; hazardous materials handling; noise pollution; and selected topics in environmental modeling, monitoring and design. Group design projects required.
     
    ME 470 Mechatronics (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Math 316, ME 204, 315 & 370, PH 220
    Analysis and design of electro-mechanical integrated systems and devices. Dynamic system models, instrumentation, data collection and analysis, and computer simulation. Includes feedback control systems.
     
    ME 480 Capstone Project I (3:3:2)
    Prerequisite: Senior standing
    Comprehensive two semester integrated design experience using the engineering design process and skills gained in engineering science classes. Product conception, development, design, and manufacture. Aspects of engineering design.
     
    ME 482 Capstone Project II (3:3:2)
    Prerequisite: Senior standing
    Continuation of the comprehensive two semester integrated design experience for using the engineering design process and skills gained in engineering science classes. Product conception, development, design, and manufacture. Aspects of engineering design.
     
    WELD 105 Essentials of Welding (4:2:6)
    Lab fees, $25 for material costs. A general welding course which includes Oxyacetylene welding, Oxyfuel Cutting (OFC), Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW), Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Flux Core Arc Welding (FCAW), Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), in the flat and horizontal positions. Includes safety procedures, electrode identification; focuses on both theory and practice.
     
    WELD 110 Welding Fundamentals (3:2:1)
    Sketching, blue print, and welding symbol interpretation; plate and pipe layout measurement; bills of materials; dimensioning, notes and specifications, and abbreviations used in fabrication. Welding techniques, principles, theory, and practices used in repair and maintenance of equipment. Includes brazing, bronze welding, arc welding, carbon arc gouging, flux core arc welding, and surfacing and its alloys.
     
    WELD 123 Advanced Weld Processes (4:2:6)
    Prerequisite: Weld 105 or concurrent enrollment
    Advanced pre-employment training emphasizing development of manipulative proficiency in SMAW, FCAW, GMAW, and GTAW in the vertical and overhead positions in light and heavy gauge plate. (Winter)
     
    WELD 225 Pipe and Structural Welding (4:2:6)
    Prerequisite: Weld 105, 123, or concurrent enrollment
    Material and configurations using SMAW, GTAW, FCAW and GMAW processes on pipe and structural shapes. Welding done in all positions on carbon, stainless steel, and aluminum.
     
    WELD 229 Certification and Code Welding (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Weld 105, Weld 123, Weld 225 or concurrent enrollment
    Interpreting and writing welding procedures and welder qualifications and specifications. Welding to AWS, API, and ASME codes to meet the entry level employment standards for code work. Training in SMAW, STAW, GMAW, and FCAW processes for qualification of welders in all positions on plate, pipe and rebar. May be taken more than once. A qualification test will be given at end of course by a qualified Certified Welding Testing Lab. (Winter)
     
    WELD 256 Automated Welding Processes (3:2:2)
    Prerequisite: Weld 105, 123, or current enrollment.
    A survey of automated welding processes and applications in the welding industry. (Panograph, Robotics, Sub-Arc) Field trips and hands-on learning included.
     
    WELD 258 Non-Destructive Testing and Inspection (2:2:2)
    Prerequisite: Weld 105, 123, 225 or current enrollment
    Theory and application of non-destructive testing systems. Techniques for quality control. Includes magnetic particle, liquid penetrant, leak, visual, and ultrasonic testing.
     
    WELD 280 Welding Fabrication (3:1:5)
    Prerequisite: Weld 105
    The use and application of equipment, tools, fasteners, and processes used in fabrication practices in the welding industry. Interpretation of drawings for fabrication of small projects. Techniques for layout, fitting, squaring, tacking, and fabricating will be developed. May be repeated for credit.