Department of Humanities & Philosophy
Department Chair: Jeff Andersen
Department Secretary: (208) -
Department Faculty: Jeff AndersenRick DavisJason FloraRodney MatsonBrian MerrillVaughn Stephenson

 
Introduction
The Humanities and Philosophy minors are a natural complement to majors such as English, History, Music, Art, and Foreign Language by providing a broader, interdisciplinary perspective to these disciplines. Moreover, due to their broad foundation of knowledge and skills, students with a Humanities or Philosophy background are sought after for graduate programs in medicine, law, and business, as well as in the social sciences. These minors will also be of interest to students of unrelated disciplines who wish to temper their technical studies with a curriculum that will prepare them for a lifetime of clear thinking and enjoyment of the arts.
 
Program Description



Minor in  Humanities (109)   
Taking an interdisciplinary approach to the study of civilization, our courses investigate art, architecture, music and literature within their political, social, and philosophical contexts. While examining the cultural foundation of modern life, students also develop insight into the meaning of human experience and prepare for life-long appreciation and enjoyment of good music, literature, art and architecture.
Requirement 1:

Take all of these Courses    
HUM 101, 201, 202, 266, 333

AND
Take 1 Course    
CHIN 345
HUM 342
INTST 341, 342, 343, 345, 349, 350
RUSS 342
SOC 347

AND
Take 1 Course    
HUM 385, 497R

 
AND
Requirement 2:

Take a two-course sequence from the list below. This requirement may also be filled by taking the foreign language exam for returned missionaries in any language.
Take 2 Courses    
ARAB 101, 102
CHIN 101, 102
FR 102, 201
GER 102, 201
GREEK 101, 102
HEB 101, 102
LATIN 101, 102
RUSS 101, 102
SPAN 102, 201



Minor in  Philosophy (124)   
A minor in philosophy is an excellent preparation for professional and graduate education and for careers in business and industry. Philosophy will prepare students to think through complex issues and to clearly articulate and rationally defend their ideas--abilities highly valued in the world of study and work. Philosophy students also tend to excel on standardized tests like the LSAT for law school, the MCAT for medical school, and GRE for graduate programs. But philosophy also enriches one's life as one begins to ponder the most profound and intriguing questions about truth and meaning.
Requirement 1:

Take 1 Course    
PHIL 110, 110H

AND
Take 1 Course    
PHIL 201, 201H

AND
Take 1 Course    
PHIL 202, 202H

 
AND
Requirement 2:

Take these Courses    
PHIL 205, 497R

 
AND
Requirement 3:

Take 2 Courses    
PHIL 313, 313H, 314, 315, 315H

AND
Take a course from the list below. This requirement may also be filled by passing the foreign language exam for returned missionaries in any language.
Take 1 Course    
ARAB 101
CHIN 101
FR 102
GER 102
GREEK 101
HEB 101
LATIN 101
RUSS 101
SPAN 102
 
Course Descriptions

HUM 101 Introduction to Humanities (3:3:0)
Fulfills GE Arts requirement.
Designed to give students a broad overview of painting, sculpture, music, literature, architecture and film. The course examines how the arts reflect humanity's attempt to find meaning and fulfillment in life.
(Fall, Winter, Summer)
 
HUM 201 The Arts in Western Culture: Pre-Historic to Renaissance (3:3:0)
Fulfills GE Arts requirement.
A study of the development of Western civilization, examining the art, architecture, music, and literature of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, and Medieval Europe [3000 BCE to 1400 AD] within historical, religious, and philosophical contexts.
(Fall, Winter, Summer)
 
HUM 202 The Arts in Western Culture: Renaissance to Modern (3:3:0)
Fulfills GE Arts requirement.
A study of the cultural development of Western civilization as expressed through art, architecture, music, and literature from the Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern periods [1400AD-present].
(Fall, Winter, Summer)
 
HUM 266 American Humanities (3:3:0)
This survey course examines American art, architecture, music, literature, and film within a historical context. Students encounter the greatest American cultural achievements and discover the diverse influences that molded the arts in America.
(Fall, Winter)
 
HUM 290R Independent Study (1-2:0:0)
Directed studies for Europe Travel Program with individualized instruction on a topic in the Humanities.
(According to need)
 
HUM 333 Spirituality in the Arts (3:3:0)
Prerequisite: Humanities 201 & 202 or Art 201 & 202
This course explores spiritual themes and concepts in art, architecture and music. Topics may include the nature of worship, art as an approach to the Divine, or religious symbolism.
(Fall, Winter)
 
HUM 342 Humanities of the Islamic World (3:3:0)
Survey of Islamic civilization including fundamental Islamic beliefs, historical development, art, architecture, music, literature and science. Students discover the cultural roots of current conflicts between Islam and the West.
(Fall, Winter)
 
HUM 385 Independant Study (1-3:0:0)
Prerequisite: Except for extenuating circumstances, students should take Humanities 101, 201, and 202 before registering for this course.
This self-study course allows one-to-one contact with a faculty member who helps focus and direct student inquiry.
(According to need)
 
HUM 497R Senior Seminar (3:3:0)
Prerequisite: Senior Status
This senior-level seminar takes an inter-disciplinary approach to topics in the Humanities as selected by the instructor. Topics may include period studies (such as the Renaissance) topical approaches (such as the concept of the hero) or theoretical or methodological studies in the Humanities.
(Fall, Winter, Summer)
 
PHIL 110 Introduction to Philosophy (3:3:0)
Fulfills GE Letters requirement.
Introduction to philosophical thought through reasoning on such topics as ethics, reality, and knowledge. Practice articulating, assessing, and rationally defending positions on philosophical issues. Includes examination of major philosophical texts.
(Fall, Winter, Summer)
 
PHIL 201 Ancient & Medieval Philosophy (3:3:0)
Fulfills GE Letters requirement.
Prerequisite: None but an inquiring mind and a willingness to study hard and participate actively.
An examination through leading texts of the historical development of western philosophy from Greek antiquity through the Middle Ages.
(Fall)
 
PHIL 202 Modern Philosophy (3:3:0)
Fulfills GE Letters requirement.
An examination through leading texts of the historical development of western philosophy from the Renaissance to the present.
(Winter)
 
PHIL 203 History of Religious Thought (3:3:0)
Fulfills GE Social Science requirement.
A survey of the development of religious thought from ancient times to the beginning of Christianity, including Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Greek, Israelite and Canaanite religions.
(Summer European Tour)
 
PHIL 204 History of Religious Thought (3:3:0)
Fulfills GE Social Science requirement.
A survey of the development of Christian religious thought from Christ to the modern era.
(Summer European Tour)
 
PHIL 205 Introduction to Logic (3:3:0)
Informal and formal logic, including syllogistic, propositional, and first-order predicate logic, and quantification theory.
(Fall)
 
PHIL 313 Introduction to Ethics (3:3:0)
Fulfills GE Letters requirement.
Introduction to and evaluation of major ethical theories and their application to contemporary moral issues. Emphasizes practice in moral reasoning.
(Winter)
 
PHIL 314 History and Philosophy of Science (3:3:0)
Fulfills GE Letters requirement.
Prerequisite: Completion of Physical Science GE class and its associated lab.
Discusses the philosophical assumptions of modern science, criteria for theory selection, and traces their historical development. Describes the historical development of basic ideas in science.
(Fall and Winter)
 
PHIL 315 Philosophy of Religion (3:3:0)
Fulfills GE Letters requirement.
Introduction to reasoning on philosophical issues regarding the existence and nature of god, religious experience, faith, religious knowledge, and the religious life.
(Fall)
 
PHIL 497R Topics in Philosophy (3:3:0)
Intensive study of a philosophical period, figure, or topic through close readings of primary and secondary texts. Includes a major research and writing project.
(Winter)