Department of Architecture & Construction
Department Chair: Brian Blaylock
Department Secretary: Kenna Carter (208) 496-1862
Department Faculty: Brian BlaylockJohn BruntRon HarkerPatrick HuishGarth JensenRudy Puzey

 
Department of Architecture and Construction
The Architecture and Construction Industry encompasses a wide range of career options. There are many excellent employment opportunities within this dynamic and growing industry. The Educational programs offered by the Architecture and Construction Department are designed to prepare students to fulfill challenging employment opportunities within the industry.

The department offers two degree programs; an Applied Associates of Science Degree in Architectural Technology (345) and an Integrated Bachelor of Science Degree in Construction Management (605). Both degrees offer a range of options that will allow students to customize their course of study to fulfill future employment ambitions. Both degrees also require a high level of academic and technical abilities and students should have developed good math, science, art and manual skills prior to enrollment in the program.

Graduation Requirements
To receive either an AAS in Architectural Technology or a BS in Construction Management, a student will need to complete the prescribed course of study with a minimum GPA of 2.25 or higher. No grade less than a C- will be accepted for any major course requirement. Students wishing to complete a BS in Construction Management are required to complete at least two semester long full time internships (Const 398 & Const 498). The internships are usually completed on the students "off track" between their Sophomore/Junior and Junior/Senior years. Students who complete an AAS in Architectural Technology are also encouraged to complete an internship.

General Interest Courses
The department also offers woodworking, architecture, construction, and home maintenance classes of general interest open to the student body and community.
 
Program Description


 
B.S.  in Construction Management (605)   
The major in Construction Management (605) is an Integrated Bachelor of Science Degree designed for those who would like to pursue a career in management in the construction industry. Students are required to complete all General Education and Major Requirements. In addition students will be required to complete either a Business Management Minor or two clusters, which consists of a Business Management Cluster and another cluster from a recommended list, which contains such things as Commercial Construction, Residential Construction, and Architectural Drafting. Students may also have the option of custom designing their clusters. However, students wishing to "custom-design" clusters will need to counsel with their advisors before beginning any coursework. Students will need to complete a minimum of 120 credit hours of coursework.
 
Minor or 2 Clusters Required

General Education Requirements

As you fill the General Education and University requirements, take the classes listed below and then go to the General Education section for a complete listing of the requirements.
 
Requirement 1:

Take these Courses    
ECON 111
ENG 316
 
AND
Take 1 Course    
MATH 108, 110
 
AND
Take 1 Course    
COMM 102, 150
IS 140

 
AND
Requirement 2:

Take 1 Course    
HFED 140
HORT 230
 
        AND
           Take 1 Course    
           BIO 202
 
        OR
           Take these Courses    
           BIO 250, 250L

 
AND
Requirement 3:

Take these Courses    
GEOL 102, 104
 
        OR
           Take these Courses    
           GEOL 111, 111L
 
                  OR
                     Take these Courses    
                     PH 105, 105L

 
Major Requirements
   
Take these Courses    Min Grade: C-
ARCH 100, 102, 110
CONST 120, 220, 230, 240, 310, 320, 330, 398, 420, 430, 440, 498
ENGRT 214, 215
MATH 111
 
AND
Take 2 Credits    Min Grade: C-
CONST 390R


 
A.A.S.  in Architectural Technology (345)   
The major in Architectural Technology (345), is a two-year specialized program for those individuals who desire to enter the architectural drafting job market at the completion of the program. Students are required to complete at least 67 hours of coursework.

Basic Education Requirements

As you fill the Basic Education Requirements and University requirements, take the classes listed below and then go to the Basic Education section for a complete listing of the requirements.
 
Take 1 Course    
MATH 108, 110
 
AND
Take 1 Course    
COMM 102
ENG 312, 316
 
Major Requirements
   
Requirement 1:

Take these Courses    Min Grade: C-
ARCH 100, 102, 110, 160, 210, 260, 270
CONST 120, 330
ENGRT 214, 215
MATH 111
 
AND
In the requirement listed below, if Const 210 is taken you must also take the lab (Const 212) for a total of 3 credits.
Take 3 Courses    Min Grade: C-
CONST 210, 220, 230, 240, 298
ENGRT 115
HFED 140
HORT 230
 
AND
Take 1 Course    Min Grade: C-
ART 101, 102

 
AND
Requirement 2:

Take these Courses    Min Grade: C-
GEOL 102, 104
 
        OR
           Take these Courses    Min Grade: C-
           GEOL 111, 111L
 
                  OR
                     Take these Courses    Min Grade: C-
                     PH 105, 105L
 
Course Descriptions

ARCH 100 Construction Documents (2:3:0)
Prerequisite: Arch 102 must be taken concurrently
Introduction to blueprint reading and UDS symbology, CSI specifications, construction terminology, codes, and the construction process. Evaluation of working drawings, specifications, and codes. Arch 102 Lab must be taken concurrently with Arch 100.
(Fall, Winter, Summer)
 
ARCH 102 Construction Documents Lab (1:0:1)
Prerequisite: This class must be taken concurrently with ARCH 100
This class will give the students the opportunity for hands-on applications using construction documents, specifications, and building codes.
(Fall, Winter, Summer)
 
ARCH 110 Architectural Computer Aided Design (3:3:3)
Prerequisite: ARCH 100 and Arch 102 or concurrent enrollment.
This is an introductory course in the use of computer aided design in architecture. Through the use of computer graphics systems and industry standard software, students will learn to measure existing buildings, draw floor plans, sections, elevations, details, plot plans, and schedules.
(Fall, Winter, Summer)
 
ARCH 160 Architectural Design and Drafting (3:2:4)
Prerequisite: Arch 100 and Arch 110 (Arch 110 could be taken simultaneously)
Construction document preparation of residential and commercial projects using the design process, sketching, and manual drafting skills. The student will learn basic design, sketching, and drafting skills in order to produce residential and commercial construction documents.
(Fall, Winter)
 
ARCH 210 Advanced Architectural Computer Aided Design (3:2:4)
Prerequisite: Arch 100, Arch 102, Arch 110, Arch 160
This is an advanced course in the use of computer aided design in architecture. Through the use of computer graphics systems and industry standard software, students will learn to develop parametric building information models; produce floor plans, sections, elevations, details, plot plans and schedules automatically; and render perspective views.
(Fall, Winter)
 
ARCH 260 Rendering and Perspective (3:3:3)
Prerequisite: Arch 100, 102, 160
Rendering and perspective is a course dealing with basic perspective fundamentals required for freehand perspective drawing. It also includes the technical principles of perspective required to layout precise perspective constructions. The course will help build basic light, color, and rendering vocabulary required for quality drawing presentations.
(Fall, Winter)
 
ARCH 270 Specifications (3:3:0)
Prerequisite: Arch 100, Arch 102, Arch 160, Const 120, Sophomore status
This course will provide in-depth information about the preparation and content of documents within a project manual. It will define and explain different types of contracts and specifications. How to write specifications will be taught and practiced during the course of the class. It will include, but not limited to, subjects like coordinating drawings and specifications, bidding requirements, construction contracts, methods of specifying, substitutions, and warranties. This information is required to take and pass the Construction Document Technology (CDT) certification test.
(Fall, Winter)
 
CONST 100 Basic Woodworking (3:2:2)
Fee:  $40.00
Basic wookworking is a study of woodworking skills for both the novice and more advanced woodworker. The course will study project planning and design, wood and wood products, safe operation of hand and power tools, and joinery techniques.
(Fall, Winter, Summer)
 
CONST 110 Home Maintenance (2:2:2)
Fee:  $10.00
Prerequisite: For non-majors only
A basic consumer course to help future homeowners understand how the basic structural, mechanical, and electrical systems work in a home. Students will gain a better understanding of modern home ownership and home maintenance through classroom and laboratory experience.
(Fall, Winter, Summer)
 
CONST 120 Structural Systems (4:3:3)
Prerequisite: Arch 100, 102, or concurrent enrollment in Arch 100, 102 is necessary.
A study of construction materials and methods of constructing structures. Classroom, lab experiences, and construction site tours give students an understanding of structural components of buildings, procedures, and applications of materials. Construction tool safey, codes, blueprint reading and application, conventional and innovative framing technology for residential and commercial construction will be emphasized.
(Fall, Winter, Summer)
 
CONST 200 Advanced Woodworking (3:2:4)
Prerequisite: Const 100
Advanced woodworking is a study of practices, materials, methods, and techniques used in the design and construction of fine wood furniture. Emphasis will be placed on materials and fine joinery techniques.
 
CONST 210 Finishing Systems (2:2:0)
Prerequisite: CONST 120, Arch 100, 102. Must be taken concurrently with Const 212 (lab)
A study of construction materials and methods of exterior and interior building finishing systems. Classroom and lab experiences give students an understanding of finishing procedures and applications of materials. Construction materials, terminology, codes, blueprint reading, installation methods, and material quantity takeoffs will be emphasized.
(Fall, Summer (even years))
 
CONST 212 Finishing Systems Lab (1:0:2)
Prerequisite: This course must be taken concurrently with CONST 210, Arch 100, Arch 102
This course will provide the opportunity for hands-on application using methods and materials discussed in CONST 210.
(Fall, Summer (even years))
 
CONST 220 Concrete and Masonry Construction (3:2:3)
Prerequisite: Arch 100, Arch 102
A study of concrete construction technology including footings, foundations, cement types, admixtures, mixing, forming, reinforcing, placement, curing, testing, cold and hot weather applications. Materials and methods used in modern masonry construction. Applicable building codes will be reviewed.
(Fall, Winter)
 
CONST 230 Mechanical Environmental Systems (3:2:2)
Prerequisite: Arch 100, 102
Materials design, installation, and applications of building service systems, including supply systems, waste removal systems; heating ventilation, air conditioning; heating loads, air distribution, equipment selection; energy efficient, and solar construction; building codes.
(Fall, Winter, 1st Summer Block)
 
CONST 240 Electrical Systems (2:2:2)
Prerequisite: Arch 100, 102
Study of materials, design of circuits and inspection for electrical heat, light and power installation in homes and small buildings. The class covers the National Electrical Code (NEC) and applicable local codes. The course applies the NEC as a standard for the layout and installation of residential electrical systems. Basic electrical theory will be presented and applications and basic wiring skills will be introduced.
(Fall, Winter, Summer ( odd years))
 
CONST 290 Special Problems (1-4:0:0)
Prerequisite: Approved after consultation with instructor in charge.
Selected problem solving in a variety of construction and architectural areas. May involve special assignment, laboratory, and on-the-job experience. Approved after consultation with instructor in charge.
 
CONST 298 Internship (1-2:0:0)
Prerequisite: For Students with less than 60 credit hours
An internship is a cooperative program between BYU-Idaho Architecture and Construction Department and approved Experience Providers (employers). Professional internships correlate actual work experience in the building construction industry and the architecture and construction coursework. Internships approved by the department internship coordinator provide students with knowledge of career opportunities and actual work experience in preparation for employment after graduation. The ideal internship would take place during the student's off-track semester and requires 240 hours of quality work experience for each credit earned. A maximum of two credit hours are available for each of the three internship courses. Two elective credits, course not required for major. General work experience in building construction or a related field. Typically taken between the freshman and sophomore years or for those students with less than 60 credit hours.
(Fall, Winter, Summer)
 
CONST 300 Cabinetmaking (3:2:4)
Prerequisite: Const 100
Cabinetmaking is a study of the materials and methods used in professional cabinetmaking. The class will study designing, planning, cost estimating, materials, and construction techniques for kitchen, bathroom, and other built-in type of cabinets using both traditional and metric construction methods. It will also cover the safe setup and operation of professional cabinetmaking equipment.
(Winter)
 
CONST 310 Construction Management (3:2:0)
Prerequisite: Arch 100, Arch 102
An introduction to organizing, controlling, and directing operations of construction companies including business ownership and management, company organization, business methods, bonds, insurance, safety, building and land use regulations, and labor relations.
(Fall, Winter)
 
CONST 320 Construction Safety (2:2:0)
Prerequisite: Arch 100, Arch 102
This course introduces students to OSHA policies, procedures, and standards, as well as construction safety and health principles. Topics include scope and application of OSHA construction standards. Special emphasis will be placed on the most common safety hazards in the construction industry. Upon successful course completion, the student will receive an OSHA construction safety and health 30-hour course certification card.
(Winter, Summer)
 
CONST 330 Construction Estimating (3:3:3)
Prerequisite: CONST 120, ARCH 100, ARCH 110, CONST 220
The purpose of Const 330 (Construction Estimating) is to introduce the student to the principles of construction cost estimates, including organizing and planning an estimate, developing material and labor databases, preparing accurate quantity takeoffs, and developing an understanding of overhead and profit.
(Fall, Winter, Summer (odd years))
 
CONST 350 Soils and Equipment (2:2:2)
Prerequisite: Arch 100, Arch 102
An introduction to soil mechanics. Soils classification. Soils exploration and testing. Cost and control of excavating, hauling, grading, compacting, lifting, and other heavy equipment.
(Fall, Winter, summer (odd years))
 
CONST 390R Construction Seminar (0.5:1:0)
Prerequisite: Completed 45 hours coursework. Sophomore status
Construction 390R is a Junior/Senior level lecture series which will introduce students to relevant topics and leaders within the construction industry. Possible topics to be covered include: estimating, scheduling, safety, team building, sales, and marketing. Additional topics such as developing internship and employment opportunities, interviewing, resume and letter writing, and salary negotiations, will also be covered.
 
CONST 398 Junior Internship (1-2:0:0)
Prerequisite: For students with less than 90 credit hours.
An internship is a cooperative program between BYU-Idaho Architecture and Construction Department and approved Experience Providers (employers). Professional internships correlate actual work experience in the building construction industry and the architecture and construction coursework. Internships approved by the department internship coordinator provide students with knowledge of career opportunities and actual work experience in preparation for employment after graduation. The ideal internship would take place during the student's off-track semester and requires 240 hours of quality work experience for each credit earned. A maximum of two credit hours are available for each of the three internship courses. Two credits, course required for construction management major. Construction intern with expanded experiences and management opportunity. Typically taken between the sophomore and junior years or for those students with less than 90 credit hours.
(Fall, Winter, Summer)
 
CONST 420 Construction Scheduling (3:3:3)
Prerequisite: Arch 100, Arch 102, Const 310, Const 330
Const 420 is an introduction to concepts of construction project scheduling including: planning and developing efficient construction schedules, methods of preparing construction schedules, and using schedules to efficiently manage job resources and control costs
(Fall, Summer)
 
CONST 430 Constrcution Law (3:3:0)
Prerequisite: Arch 100, Const 310, Const 330
The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to contract law and the legal requirements, regulations, and hazards of operating a construction enterprise.
(Fall, Winter, Summer (even years) )
 
CONST 440 Construction Project Management (3:3:0)
Prerequisite: Arch 100, Arch 102, Const 310, Const 420 or Concurrent Registration
Construction Project Management is an introduction to onsite management and control of construction projects including overall project management, the management of people, materials and time, and the management of financial resources.
(Fall, Winter)
 
CONST 460 Residential Construction Practices (2:2:0)
Prerequisite: Arch 100, Arch 102, Const 120, Const 220, Const 212, Const 330
An overview of construction management practices in residential construction. Focuses on construction and contracting methods, productivity, work activity sequencing, and company organizations. Leadership and communication skills, construction ethics will also be covered.
(Winter)
 
CONST 498 Construction Internship (1-2:0:0)
Prerequisite: Final internship prior to employment
An internship is a cooperative program between BYU-Idaho Architecture and Construction Department and approved Experience Providers (employers). Professional internships correlate actual work experience in the building construction industry and the architecture and construction coursework. Internships approved by the department internship coordinator provide students with knowledge of career opportunities and actual work experience in preparation for employment after graduation. The ideal internship would take place during the student's off-track semester and requires 240 hours of quality work experience for each credit earned. A maximum of two credit hours are available for each of the three internship courses. Two credits, course required for construction management major. Construction intern experience combining classroom and on-the-job knowledge from past experiences. Intended to be the final internship prior to employment. Focus should be given to those experience providers and professional interests that the student would consider for employment following graduation.
(Fall, Winter, Summer)