Department of Health Science
Department Chair: Lynn Perkes
Department Secretary: Jean Hardy (208) 496-1333
Department Faculty: Kelly EvansJames LamphJohn LewisMarie ParkinsonFred PearsonLynn PerkesBrian SchaatLarry ShawNathan Yearsley

 
Department of Health Science
During the past several years there has been a strong shift in emphasis toward well trained technical support for professionals at the Baccalaureate and Graduate level in the Health Sciences. To address this need, BYU-Idaho has developed a variety of courses designed to focus on the preparation of specialists in a variety of Health Care specialties.
 
Program Description


 
B.S.  in Health Science (750)   
A degree in Health Science provides a variety of employment opportunities. There are three major areas of emphasis: 1) Public Health (39), 2) Corporate Health and Safety (43), 3) Health Promotion and Lifetime Wellness (42). Each student will have the opportunity to select a minor or two clusters (12-15 credits each) that will enhance their marketability. Confer with your advisor regarding recommended minors or clusters.
 
Minor or 2 Clusters Required

University Requirements

Religion Requirements

(Book of Mormon Courses)
Take these Courses   
REL 121, 122
 
       OR
          Take these Courses   
          REL 121H, 122H
 
                 OR
                    Take this Course   
                    REL 221

AND
(Scripture Based Courses)
Take 6 Credits   
REL 211, 212, 301, 302, 324
 
       OR
          Take 6 Credits   
          REL 211H, 212H, 301H, 302H, 324H

AND
(Other Religion Courses)
Take 4 Credits   
REL 100, 130, 215, 234, 235, 260, 261, 264, 333, 341, 341H, 342, 342H, 351, 352, 370, 431, 471, 475

Online Learning

Each student is required to take at least one online course. For more information about the online requirement please visit the Online Learning section found in the Graduation & Transfer section of the catalog or visit http://web.byui.edu/Catalog/2005-2006/generalEducation.htm.

Other online course information is available at http://www2.byui.edu/insttech/online.htm. A list of online courses is available at http://www2.byui.edu/insttech/OnlineCourses/onlinecalendar.htm (select a semester or term).

GE Requirements

I. Reading and Writing

   Take 1 Course
   ENG 111, 111C, 111H

AND
   Take 1 Course
   ENG 316, 316C  

II. Mathematics

  • Math 101 may be used as meeting the Math General Education requirement if all of the following criteria are met: 1)Student was enrolled and completed Math 101 prior to Fall 2001; 2)The student's major does not require a higher math class; 3)There is no break in enrollment.
  • Students initiating their studies at BYU-Idaho Fall Semester 2001 or later are not eligible for the ACT math waiver and must take one of the following courses to fill the math requirement.

       Take 1 Course
       MATH 108, 108H, 110, 110H  

    III. Basic Skills

       Take 1 Course
       HS 131, 131W  

    IV. Arts

       Take 1 Course
       ART 101, 160, 201, 202
       HFED 140
       HORT 230
       HUM 101, 101H, 201, 201H, 202, 202H
       MUSIC 100, 101
       TA 115, 117

    AND
       Take this Course
       FA 100

    V. Letters
    Generally the Letters requirement is filled by taking one of the courses listed below. However, HUM 201 and 202, taken together, can be used to fill both the Arts and Letters requirement.

       Take 1 Course
       CHIN 347
       ENG 250, 250H, 251, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 351, 352, 353, 354, 362, 373, 373H
       FR 202
       GER 202
       HON 200, 220, 221H, 222
       LANG 202
       PH 314
       PHIL 110, 110H, 201, 201H, 202, 202H, 313, 313H, 314, 315, 315H
       RUSS 340, 340H
       SPAN 202, 302

    VI. Biological Science

       Take 4 Credits
       BIO 264  

    VII. Physical Science

       Take 4 Credits
       CHEM 101, 105, 105H  

    VIII. American Institutions

       Take 1 Course
       ECON 111, 111H  

    IX. Social Science
    This course must be in a different discipline from the course taken to fill the American Institutions requirement.

       Take 1 Course
       SOC 112, 112H  

    Major Requirements

       Take these Courses   Min GPA: 2.0
       BIO 221, 222, 265
       HS 320, 340, 350R, 470, 490, 498
       MATH 221

    AND
       Take 1 Course   Min GPA: 2.0
       HS 222, 223

  • Emphasis in Public Health  (39)   
    Public Health is involved with the prevention and treatment of health problems in a population. A variety of careers are available for a graduate with this major. These include working for local, state, and federal government health agencies, volunteer health organizations, business and industrial entities, and other institutions that provide health and medical care to groups and individuals.
    Take these Courses    Min GPA: 2.0
    HS 360, 400
    PH 101, 101L
     
    AND
    Take 7 Credits    Min GPA: 2.0
    HFED 100
    HS 100, 280, 349, 349L, 351, 355R, 365, 375, 401, 410, 450, 455R, 460, 480, 485, 486
    PE 375

    Emphasis in Health Promotion & Lifetime Wellness  (42)   
    A Health Science degree with an emphasis in Health Promotion and Lifetime Wellness will prepare a student, both theoretically and experientially, for career opportunities including Community Health Educator, Health Promotion Specialist, Corporate Wellness, Health Counseling, Resort Wellness, Fitness Center, Educational Health Promotion, Wilderness Health Promotion and Lifestyle Training Specialist.
    Take these Courses    Min GPA: 2.0
    HFED 100
    HS 365, 401, 410
    PE 375
     
    AND
    Take 2 Credits    Min GPA: 2.0
    HS 100, 280, 349, 349L, 351, 355R, 360, 375, 400, 450, 455R, 460, 480, 485, 486
    PH 101, 101L

    Emphasis in Corporate Health & Safety  (43)   
    A degree in Corporate Health and Safety helps prepare students for working in the industrial and maufacturing industry. In this setting, graduates oversee and administer health and safety procedures relating to the industrial work environment. Areas of responsibility include hazardous materials management, compliance with OSHA requirements and facilitation of worker safety guidelines, interaction with Human Resources on employee-management health and safety issues and laws, and in some cases implementation and administration of company health promotion programs.
    Take these Courses    Min GPA: 2.0
    HS 400, 485, 486
    PH 101, 101L
     
    AND
    Take 4 Credits    Min GPA: 2.0
    HFED 100
    HS 100, 280, 349, 349L, 351, 355R, 360, 365, 375, 401, 410, 450, 455R, 460, 480
    PE 375


     
    B.S.  in Health Education (920)   
    Health Education is offered as a major or minor under the Secondary Education degree. Graduates will have completed all the course work for education including student teaching. This degree will certify the student to teach in 42 states.

    For a listing of approved Secondary Education majors and minors see the Teacher Education section of this catalog.

    University Requirements

    Religion Requirements

    (Book of Mormon Courses)
    Take these Courses   
    REL 121, 122
     
           OR
              Take these Courses   
              REL 121H, 122H
     
                     OR
                        Take this Course   
                        REL 221

    AND
    (Scripture Based Courses)
    Take 6 Credits   
    REL 211, 212, 301, 302, 324
     
           OR
              Take 6 Credits   
              REL 211H, 212H, 301H, 302H, 324H

    AND
    (Other Religion Courses)
    Take 4 Credits   
    REL 100, 130, 215, 234, 235, 260, 261, 264, 333, 341, 341H, 342, 342H, 351, 352, 370, 431, 471, 475

    Online Learning

    Each student is required to take at least one online course. For more information about the online requirement please visit the Online Learning section found in the Graduation & Transfer section of the catalog or visit http://web.byui.edu/Catalog/2005-2006/generalEducation.htm.

    Other online course information is available at http://www2.byui.edu/insttech/online.htm. A list of online courses is available at http://www2.byui.edu/insttech/OnlineCourses/onlinecalendar.htm (select a semester or term).

    GE Requirements
    I. Reading and Writing

       Take 1 Course
       ENG 111, 111C, 111H

    AND
       Take 1 Course
       ENG 311, 311C, 311H, 312, 312C, 313, 313C, 314, 315, 315C, 316, 316C
       HIST 300, 300H

    II. Mathematics

  • Math 101 may be used as meeting the Math General Education requirement if all of the following criteria are met: 1)Student was enrolled and completed Math 101 prior to Fall 2001; 2)The student's major does not require a higher math class; 3)There is no break in enrollment.
  • Students initiating their studies at BYU-Idaho Fall Semester 2001 or later are not eligible for the ACT math waiver and must take one of the following courses to fill the math requirement.

       Take 1 Course
       MATH 108, 108H, 110, 110H, 111, 112, 113, 214, 221, 306

    III. Basic Skills

       Take 1 Course
       HS 131, 131W  

    IV. Arts

       Take 1 Course
       ART 101, 160, 201, 202
       HFED 140
       HORT 230
       HUM 101, 101H, 201, 201H, 202, 202H
       MUSIC 100, 101
       TA 115, 117

    AND
       Take this Course
       FA 100

    V. Letters
    Generally the Letters requirement is filled by taking one of the courses listed below. However, HUM 201 and 202, taken together, can be used to fill both the Arts and Letters requirement.

       Take 1 Course
       CHIN 347
       ENG 250, 250H, 251, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 351, 352, 353, 354, 362, 373, 373H
       FR 202
       GER 202
       HON 200, 220, 221H, 222
       LANG 202
       PH 314
       PHIL 110, 110H, 201, 201H, 202, 202H, 313, 313H, 314, 315, 315H
       RUSS 340, 340H
       SPAN 202, 302

    VI. Biological Science

       Take 4 Credits
       BIO 264  

    VII. Physical Science

       Take 4 Credits
       CHEM 100, 101, 105, 105H, 106, 106H
       GEOG 101, 101L
       GEOL 101, 102, 103, 103L, 104, 110, 110L, 111, 111L
       PH 101, 101L, 102, 105, 105L, 106, 106L, 115, 116, 121, 127, 127L, 150
       PH.S 100, 100L, 110

    VIII. American Institutions

       Take 1 Course
       AMHER 170, 170H
       ECON 111, 111H
       HIST 120, 121
       POLSC 110

    IX. Social Science
    This course must be in a different discipline from the course taken to fill the American Institutions requirement.

       Take 1 Course
       ED 270  

    Major Requirements

       Take these Courses   Min GPA: 2.0
       BIO 265
       HFED 100
       HS 405, 430, 460

    AND
       Take 1 Course   Min GPA: 2.0
       HS 222, 223

    AND
       Take 1 Course   Min GPA: 2.0
       PSYCH 111, 111H

    AND

       Take 8 Credits   Min GPA: 2.0
       HS 300, 320, 340, 349, 349L, 351, 401, 410, 490

    Education Core:
    AND
       Take these Courses
       ED 200, 492
       SECED 280, 410

    AND
       Take 1 Course
       ED 285
       SECED 252
       SPED 322



  • Minor in  Health Science (123)   

    Take these Courses    Min GPA: 2.0
    HS 320, 340, 350R, 470, 490

    AND
    Take 1 Course    Min GPA: 2.0
    HS 131, 131W

    AND
    Take 1 Course    Min GPA: 2.0
    HS 222, 223

    AND

    Take 6 Credits    Min GPA: 2.0
    BIO 264, 265
    HFED 100
    HS 100, 280, 349, 349L, 351, 360, 365, 375, 400, 401, 410, 450, 460, 480, 485, 486
    PE 375



    Minor in  Health Education (171)   
    For a listing of approved Secondary Education majors and minors see the Teacher Education section of this catalog.

    Take these Courses    Min GPA: 2.0
    BIO 264
    HFED 100
    HS 405, 430, 460

    AND
    Take 1 Course    Min GPA: 2.0
    HS 131, 131W

    AND
    (Take at least 2 credits from the list below)
    Take 2 Credits    Min GPA: 2.0
    BIO 265
    HS 222, 223, 300, 320, 340, 349, 349L, 351, 401, 410, 490
     
    Course Descriptions

    HS 100 Introduction to Health Professions (1:1:0)
    A survey course for students majoring in one of the Health Science degree programs. Department requirements, career emphasis and related careers will be discussed.
    (Fall, Winter)
     
    HS 131 Personal Health & Wellness (2:2:0)
    Fulfills GE Basic Skills requirement.
    This Personal Health and Wellness course is designed to provide scientific health information which promotes desirable attitudes and behavior toward health and wellness. This course includes lecture and outside of class activities. This class satisfies the Basic Skills Option requirement.
    (Fall, Winter, Summer)
     
    HS 131W Women's Health Issues (2:2:0)
    Fulfills GE Basic Skills requirement.
    Prerequisite: You must be a woman.
    Introduction to women's issues. A multi-disciplinary study of women's emotional and physical issues in today's society, including health care, identifying groups at risk, and learning to maintain a healthy life style.
    (Fall, Winter, 1st Summer)
     
    HS 222 Advanced First Aid (3:3:0)
    First Aid is the immediate care given to a person who has been injured or who suddenly becomes ill. It includes self-help and home care if more advanced medical assistance is not needed or is delayed. In Advanced First Aid, the student is trained to provide emergency medical care in a wide range of acute care situations. There will be many opportunities for hands-on simulated training throughout the course of this class.

    At the successful completion of this course, each qualifying student will receive a First Aid card and a CPR Certification card issued by the NATIONAL SAFETY COUNCIL.
    (Fall, Winter, Summer)
     
    HS 223 Wilderness First Aid (3:3:0)
    Fee:  $13.00
    First Aid is the immediate care given to a person who has been injured or suddenly becomes ill. Wilderness First Aid teaches protocols followed if a person is more than two hours from advanced medical support. This does not always have to be in a wilderness setting. Many times natural disasters will place individuals in situations where accessibility to advanced medical support is greatly limited or non-existent. At the completion of this course, the student will receive national certification in Wilderness First Aid & CPR. There will be one overnight field trip during the semester to engage in a mock First Aid activity.
    (Fall, Winter, 2nd Summer)
     
    HS 280 Medical Terminology (2:2:0)
    This class is an introduction course into the language of medicine.
    (Fall, Winter, 1st Summer)
     
    HS 299 Professional Experience Seminar (1-3:0:0)
    This class is designed to offer credit to students ready for "hands-on" experience in helping with teaching, recording, and organizational experiences. Credit is to be determined according to the workload arranged by you and the supervising professor.
    (Fall, Winter, Summer)
     
    HS 300 Environmental Health for Secondary Teachers (3:3:0)
    Introduction to the field of environmental health. This course investigates the impact on our environment of water pollution, air pollution, solid and hazardous waste, resource recovery and reuse, energy sources, and population and how the environment impacts personal health. It is designed to prepare teachers for classroom teaching.
    (Fall, Winter)
     
    HS 320 Introduction to Communicable and Non-Communicable Diseases (3:3:0)
    Introduction to the general principles of disease. Etiology, signs, symptoms, treatment and management of diseases that affect individuals and their various body systems.
    (Fall, Winter, 1st Summer)
     
    HS 340 Introduction to Community Health (3:3:0)
    Introduction to agencies, facilities, and programs playing a role in the prevention of disease and the promotion of health in the community. Special emphasis is placed on the competencies needed for community health professionals and health educators to function in a variety of community and teaching settings.
    (Fall, Winter, 1st Summer)
     
    HS 349 Sports Medicine (3:3:0)
    Designed for health professional students i.e. athletic trainers, coaches, health and physical educators, physical therapists, EMT's and premedical students for recognition, evaluation, and care of injuries. Techniques in prevention, and rehabilitation of injuries will be presented.
    (Fall, Winter)
     
    HS 349L Sports Medicine Lab (1:0:2)
    Fee:  $35.00
    Numerous prevention and therapeutic techniques will be presented i.e. taping, bracing, skin care, nausea and basic sports related illnesses.
    (Fall, Winter)
     
    HS 350R Current Health Issues (1:1:0)
    This course is designed to be repeated for credit. The student will design and pursue advanced knowledge in an area of interest in the health field. This course will require extensive internet and hands on work. At the conclusion of the course the student will turn in a research paper or summary of experience attained throughout the semester. No more than 3 credits can be taken toward graduation.
    (Fall, Winter, 2nd Summer)
     
    HS 351 Gerontology (2:2:0)
    This class is designed to include the scientific study of the biological, psychological, and social aspects of aging.
    (Fall, Winter)
     
    HS 355R Athletic Training Clinical Experience (1-3:0:0)
    May be repeated for a maximum total of 5 credits with no more than 2 credits per semester. The contact hours per week to be arranged with instructor. Practical application and clinical experience in health skills and use of therapeutic and health evaluation modalities. A maximum of 3 credits will apply toward graduation.
    (Fall, Winter, Summer)
     
    HS 360 Community & Public Health Administration (3:3:0)
    Functions of local, state, and federal agencies that provide guidelines and funding to health care facilities. Emphasis will be placed on the factors that have a major impact on health care agency programs and services.
    (Fall, Winter)
     
    HS 365 Kinesiology (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: BIO 264 & BIO 265
    Study of functional anatomy with application of basic kinesiological principles in the analysis of human motion and ergonomic considerations.
    (Fall, Winter)
     
    HS 375 Wilderness Health Promotion (2:2:0)
    Utilization of nature and non-traditional class room settings to instruct others in the improvement of personal wellness. Emphasis on getting individuals out of the office and into the outdoors to experience the healing and rejuvenating power of nature.
    (Fall, Winter)
     
    HS 400 Environmental Health (3:3:0)
    Environmental health comprises those aspects of human health including quality of life that are determined by physical, biological, social, and psychosocial factors in the environment. This course provides a concise knowledge base of how our environment including air, water, food, and environmental agents may effect human health.
    (Fall, Winter, 2nd summer)
     
    HS 401 Lifestyle Management Instructor (3:3:0)
    This course is designed to give students an exposure to different lifestyle enhancement tools and techniques. The students will gain information that will enable them to teach individuals or groups lifestyle improving behaviors and techniques.
    (Fall, Winter, 2nd Summer)
     
    HS 405 Health Teaching Methods (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: HS 131 or 131W, BIO 264, BIO 265. Must be a declared Health Education Major or Minor in junior or senior year. Health Minors are not required to have BIO 265.
    Health for the secondary teacher, emphasizing his or her role as a health educator, methodologies of teaching, and a wide variety of strategies for teaching health education.
    (Fall, Winter, 1st Summer)
     
    HS 410 Fitness Appraisal & Prescription (4:3:2)
    Fee:  $15.00
    Prerequisite: HS 131, BIO 264, and BIO 265. Must be a Sophomore, Junior or Senior status.
    Methodologies and techniques for evaluations of health and fitness values including body composition, maximal oxygen consumption, antropometric measurements, blood values, blood pressure, stress, nutrition, respiratory, lifestyle habits, etc. Principles of health program prescription based on individual values and recommended improvements.
    (Fall, Winter, 1st Summer)
     
    HS 430 School Health Programs (3:3:0)
    Must declare Health Education as a major or minor and have completed the majority of freshman and sophomore core work. This class is designed to inform the future teacher about the comprehensive health education environment including both the school and the community health programs and procedures. The class also prepares students for recognizing and dealing with "at risk" students. Introduction to needs assessment, program development, finances evaluation, and implementation of school health programs will be covered.
    (Fall, Winter)
     
    HS 450 Environmental Sanitation and Water Quality Management (3:3:0)
    Engineering, biological and management principles of community water supply and water treatment. Comprehensive study of the environmental health and safety practices, procedures and laws as applied to food establishments, recreation sites, housing facilities, medical institutions and industrial sites throughout the United States. Field trips will be required to local facilities.
    (Fall, Winter, 2nd Summer)
     
    HS 455R Health/Fitness Clinical Experience (1-2:0:0)
    Prerequisite: Concurrent or past registration in HS 410. CPR certified staff.
    Practical application of health and fitness assessment protocols. Skills are applied in a clinical setting. May be repeated for a maximum of 5 credits with no more than 2 credits/semester and only 3 credits applied toward graduation.
    (Fall, Winter, 1st Summer, 2nd Summer)
     
    HS 460 Drugs of Use and Abuse (3:3:0)
    The nature and effects of alcohol and other drugs on human beings, considered from physiological, psychological, and sociological viewpoints as well as the educational and legal aspects.
    (Fall, Winter, 2nd Summer)
     
    HS 470 Epidemiology (3:3:0)
    The study of the distribution of diseases and pathophysiological conditions of humans and of factors which influence their occurrence. The course requires an understanding of the statistical principles.
    (Fall, Winter, Summer-must take both terms)
     
    HS 480 International Health (3:3:0)
    Explores meaning of "health" as it applies to people of many different cultures throughout the world. Provides an international evaluation of the health status of these many different cultures, including their morbidity and mortality rates. Evaluates the many health promotion methods used to create healthy lifestyles and environmental concerns among these cultures.
    (Fall, Winter)
     
    HS 485 Toxicology (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Chemistry 101 or 105, Biology 221 and 222
    Presents a survey of the impact of toxic chemicals found in the environment and workplace. Discussion of the basic principles of toxicology, the environmental and biological impacts of toxic chemicals, and the regulatory guidelines for working with these chemicals.
    (Fall, Winter)
     
    HS 486 Occupational Safety and Risk Management (3:3:0)
    This course is designed to develop an understanding of basic occupational safety and health terminology, principles and practices through education and practical activities.
    (Fall, Winter)
     
    HS 490 Planning, Implementing and Evaluation of Health Programs (3:3:0)
    Individual, school, and community involvement in the concepts and skills needed in the prevention of disease, improvement of healthy lifestyles and the health promotion techniques throughout the entire life-span. Emphasis is placed on needs assessments, health planning and health marketing.
    (Fall, Winter, 2nd Summer)
     
    HS 498 Internship (1-3:0:0)
    Students will be placed in a job related experience with various settings (e.g.) hospital, doctor's office, medical clinic, state health department, industrial/corporation, nursing home, etc. This class is normally taken during your off track of your senior year.
    (Fall, Winter, Summer)