Department of Sociology and Social Work
Department Chair: Grover Wray
Department Secretary: Devony Wilson (208) 496-1363
Department Faculty: Steven HayMartin McDonellJack ReinwandPaul RobertsStephen SmithSteve StokesMike TatumGrover Wray

 
Introduction
Sociology and social work studies are concerned with the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Subject matter ranges from the immediate family to the hostile mob, from crime to religion, and from the divisions of race and social class to the shared beliefs of a common culture.

The mission of the Sociology and Social Work Department is:
  • Prepare majors to incorporate Christian service into their careers and personal lives.
  • Help General Education students gain an appreciation for the social and cultural influences affecting them, their families and society.
  • Prepare majors for advanced study and careers in the fields of sociology, social work, criminology, and anthropology.
  • Develop knowledge and skills related to successful human interaction and function pertaining to society, culture, the social environment, and social justice.
     
  • Career Opportunities
    A degree in sociology prepares students for higher education with eventual careers in teaching, organizational development, or research. Opportunities also exist in the military and in private security. A social work degree will prepare students planning for careers as case workers for juvenile delinquents, mental health clients or children's services. The department also offers a limited number of courses in anthropology, the study of humankind. These courses are designed to expand the students' understanding of themselves in relation to other cultures and ideas.
     
    Criminology
    Criminology is an area of study within Sociology; no degree is offered. However, students who choose to take Soc 330 and 443 and three other courses related to criminology will receive a certificate from the department.
     
    Pre-Law
    Sociology or Criminology are choices for students desiring to take the LSAT (Law School Aptitude Test) and apply for law school. Students may choose other majors such as English, History, Accounting, Business, etc.
     
    Bachelor's Social Work Program Mission
    The mission of the BYU-Idaho Social Work Program is to support the overall mission of BYU-Idaho and the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and to help students develop knowledge to become competent and effective communicators and professional social workers for generalist social work practice and Christian service with individuals, groups, families, communities, and society.

    To help students of diverse interest and abilities to use and integrate social work historically grounded purposes, philosophy, knowledge, values, supervision, consultation, and skills for leadership in the evaluation and development of social policy, social service delivery systems, professional employment, and for their roles as citizens and parents. To promote economic and social justice and prepare graduates to work within the context of their clients' specific cultures.
     
    Social Work Accreditation
    The Baccalaureate Social Work program at BYU-Idaho is in the process of seeking accreditation through the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). The Social Work program is in the second year of candidacy with CSWE. This is a major step in the accreditation process. Students should be aware that there are some inherent risks in attending a non-accredited baccalaureate social work (BSW) program, relative to transfer or eventual social work licensing. The Social Work program at BYU-Idaho, like many programs on campus, is in the transitional process. Although we have not yet received full accreditation, we graduated our first class in April 2005 (a program usually remains in candidacy status for one to three year), until it attains initial accreditation. If CSWE initial accreditation is granted it automatically covers those graduating classes of students who were admitted during or after the academic year the program was granted candidacy. (Please see a Social Work advisor if you feel you need more information or details).
     
    Social Work Application Process
    Only students accepted into the Social Work Program are Social Work majors.

    Freshmen and Sophomore students choose a major of their choice (e.g. usually General Education, Sociology, or some other social science discipline). Students fulfill G.E. and Social Work prerequisite course work during their Freshmen and Sophomore years and make application to the program during the second semester of their Sophomore year.

    Application will be required for admission to the BSW Program; the following will be required:

    Second semester Sophomore standing, completion of most general education requirements, cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher, a statement of psychological well-being, three letters of reference, and a personal autobiography (two pages or less). In addition the following prerequisite course work: Social Work 260, Sociology 111 or 112 with grades of B range or better, Human Biology Bio 230 or 264, Statistics 221, Psychology 111 with grades of C range or better. Please access the application online at Department of Sociology and Social Work
     
    Program Description


     
    B.S.  in Social Work (500)   
    No double counting of major courses.

    University Requirements

    Religion Requirements

    (Book of Mormon Courses)
    Take these Courses   
    REL 121, 122
     
           OR
              Take these Courses   
              REL 121H, 122H
     
                     OR
                        Take this Course   
                        REL 221

    AND
    (Scripture Based Courses)
    Take 6 Credits   
    REL 211, 212, 301, 302, 324
     
           OR
              Take 6 Credits   
              REL 211H, 212H, 301H, 302H, 324H

    AND
    (Other Religion Courses)
    Take 4 Credits   
    REL 100, 130, 215, 234, 235, 260, 261, 264, 333, 341, 341H, 342, 342H, 351, 352, 370, 431, 471, 475

    Online Learning

    Each student is required to take at least one online course. For more information about the online requirement please visit the Online Learning section found in the Graduation & Transfer section of the catalog or visit http://web.byui.edu/Catalog/2005-2006/generalEducation.htm.

    Other online course information is available at http://www2.byui.edu/insttech/online.htm. A list of online courses is available at http://www2.byui.edu/insttech/OnlineCourses/onlinecalendar.htm (select a semester or term).

    GE Requirements

    (Eng. 315 is recommended to fill the Reading and Writing requirement)

    I. Reading and Writing

       Take 1 Course
       ENG 111, 111C, 111H

    AND
       Take 1 Course
       ENG 311, 311C, 311H, 315, 315C, 316, 316C  

    II. Mathematics
  • Math 101 may be used as meeting the Math General Education requirement if all of the following criteria are met: 1)Student was enrolled and completed Math 101 prior to Fall 2001; 2)The student's major does not require a higher math class; 3)There is no break in enrollment.
  • Students initiating their studies at BYU-Idaho Fall Semester 2001 or later are not eligible for the ACT math waiver and must take one of the following courses to fill the math requirement.

       Take 1 Course
       MATH 221  

    III. Basic Skills

       Take 1 Course
       COMM 102, 150, 150H
       CS 100
       HS 131, 131W
       IS 140

              OR
                 Take this Course
                 PE 177

              AND
                 Take 1 Course
                 PE 100, 101, 102, 110, 115, 117, 118, 119, 121, 123, 124, 126, 127, 128, 131, 133, 134, 139, 140, 141, 144, 145, 147, 148, 160, 161, 162, 175, 178, 179, 195, 196

    IV. Arts

       Take 1 Course
       ART 101, 160, 201, 202
       HFED 140
       HORT 230
       HUM 101, 101H, 201, 201H, 202, 202H
       MUSIC 100, 101
       TA 115, 117

    AND
       Take this Course
       FA 100

    V. Letters
    Generally the Letters requirement is filled by taking one of the courses listed below. However, HUM 201 and 202, taken together, can be used to fill both the Arts and Letters requirement.

       Take 1 Course
       CHIN 347
       ENG 250, 250H, 251, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 351, 352, 353, 354, 362, 373, 373H
       FR 202
       GER 202
       HON 200, 220, 221H, 222
       LANG 202
       PH 314
       PHIL 110, 110H, 201, 201H, 202, 202H, 313, 313H, 314, 315, 315H
       RUSS 340, 340H
       SPAN 202, 302

    VI. Biological Science

       Take 4 Credits
       BIO 230, 264  

    VII. Physical Science

       Take 4 Credits
       CHEM 100, 101, 105, 105H, 106, 106H
       GEOG 101, 101L
       GEOL 101, 102, 103, 103L, 104, 110, 110L, 111, 111L
       PH 101, 101L, 102, 105, 105L, 106, 106L, 115, 116, 121, 127, 127L, 150
       PH.S 100, 100L, 110

    VIII. American Institutions

       Take 1 Course
       AMHER 170, 170H
       ECON 111, 111H
       HIST 120, 121
       POLSC 110

    IX. Social Science
    This course must be in a different discipline from the course taken to fill the American Institutions requirement.

       Take 1 Course
       SOC 111, 111H, 112, 112H  

    Major Requirements

       Take these Courses
       HS 460
       PSYCH 342
       SW 260, 311, 340, 362, 364, 365, 367, 400, 463, 464, 465, 466, 470

    AND
       Take 1 Course
       PSYCH 111, 111H

    AND
       Take 1 Course
       CHILD 320
       SOC 383

    AND

       Repeat 2 times
       SW 497R

    AND
       Repeat 2 times
       SW 498R

    AND
       Take 9 Credits
       ARAB 101, 101H, 102, 102H
       CHILD 210, 210H, 330, 440
       CHIN 101, 101H, 102
       COMM 150, 150H, 350
       FAML 360, 460
       FR 101, 102
       GER 101, 102
       HEB 101H, 102H
       HS 280, 351
       IS 140
       PSYCH 201, 201H, 235
       RL 320, 370
       RUSS 101, 101H, 102
       SIGN 101, 102
       SOC 111, 111H, 112, 112H, 210, 300, 301, 323, 330, 357, 360, 365, 370, 390, 420, 440, 443, 450, 460
       SPAN 101, 102


  •  
    B.S.  in Sociology (780)   

    University Requirements

    Religion Requirements

    (Book of Mormon Courses)
    Take these Courses   
    REL 121, 122
     
           OR
              Take these Courses   
              REL 121H, 122H
     
                     OR
                        Take this Course   
                        REL 221

    AND
    (Scripture Based Courses)
    Take 6 Credits   
    REL 211, 212, 301, 302, 324
     
           OR
              Take 6 Credits   
              REL 211H, 212H, 301H, 302H, 324H

    AND
    (Other Religion Courses)
    Take 4 Credits   
    REL 100, 130, 215, 234, 235, 260, 261, 264, 333, 341, 341H, 342, 342H, 351, 352, 370, 431, 471, 475

    Online Learning

    Each student is required to take at least one online course. For more information about the online requirement please visit the Online Learning section found in the Graduation & Transfer section of the catalog or visit http://web.byui.edu/Catalog/2005-2006/generalEducation.htm.

    Other online course information is available at http://www2.byui.edu/insttech/online.htm. A list of online courses is available at http://www2.byui.edu/insttech/OnlineCourses/onlinecalendar.htm (select a semester or term).

    GE Requirements
    I. Reading and Writing

       Take 1 Course
       ENG 111, 111C, 111H

    AND
       Take 1 Course
       ENG 311, 311C, 311H, 312, 312C, 313, 313C, 314, 315, 315C, 316, 316C
       HIST 300, 300H

    II. Mathematics

  • Math 101 may be used as meeting the Math General Education requirement if all of the following criteria are met: 1)Student was enrolled and completed Math 101 prior to Fall 2001; 2)The student's major does not require a higher math class; 3)There is no break in enrollment.
  • Students initiating their studies at BYU-Idaho Fall Semester 2001 or later are not eligible for the ACT math waiver and must take one of the following courses to fill the math requirement.

       Take 1 Course
       MATH 221  

    III. Basic Skills

       Take 1 Course
       COMM 102, 150, 150H
       CS 100
       HS 131, 131W
       IS 140

              OR
                 Take this Course
                 PE 177

              AND
                 Take 1 Course
                 PE 100, 101, 102, 110, 115, 117, 118, 119, 121, 123, 124, 126, 127, 128, 131, 133, 134, 139, 140, 141, 144, 145, 147, 148, 160, 161, 162, 175, 178, 179, 195, 196

    IV. Arts

       Take 1 Course
       ART 101, 160, 201, 202
       HFED 140
       HORT 230
       HUM 101, 101H, 201, 201H, 202, 202H
       MUSIC 100, 101
       TA 115, 117

    AND
       Take this Course
       FA 100

    V. Letters
    Generally the Letters requirement is filled by taking one of the courses listed below. However, HUM 201 and 202, taken together, can be used to fill both the Arts and Letters requirement.

       Take 1 Course
       CHIN 347
       ENG 250, 250H, 251, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 351, 352, 353, 354, 362, 373, 373H
       FR 202
       GER 202
       HON 200, 220, 221H, 222
       LANG 202
       PH 314
       PHIL 110, 110H, 201, 201H, 202, 202H, 313, 313H, 314, 315, 315H
       RUSS 340, 340H
       SPAN 202, 302

    VI. Biological Science

       Take 4 Credits
       AGRON 122, 270
       BIO 100, 100H, 102, 102H, 118, 120, 130, 150, 150L, 176, 200, 202, 208, 221, 222, 230, 250, 264, 265, 268

    VII. Physical Science

       Take 4 Credits
       CHEM 100, 101, 105, 105H, 106, 106H
       GEOG 101, 101L
       GEOL 101, 102, 103, 103L, 104, 110, 110L, 111, 111L
       PH 101, 101L, 102, 105, 105L, 106, 106L, 115, 116, 121, 127, 127L, 150
       PH.S 100, 100L, 110

    VIII. American Institutions

       Take 1 Course
       AMHER 170, 170H
       ECON 111, 111H
       HIST 120, 121
       POLSC 110

    IX. Social Science
    This course must be in a different discipline from the course taken to fill the American Institutions requirement.

       Take 1 Course
       SOC 111, 111H  

    Major Requirements
    No double counting of major courses

       Take these Courses
       SOC 293, 303, 323, 340, 370

    AND
       Take 1 Course
       SOC 112, 112H

    AND
       Take 1 Course
       SOC 495, 498

    AND

    (Soc 311 & SW 311 are the same course)
       Take 7 Courses
       ANTH 101, 101H
       CHILD 210, 210H
       HS 460
       POLSC 280, 311
       PSYCH 111, 111H, 342, 350
       SOC 120, 204, 205, 206, 301, 303, 311, 330, 357, 360, 365, 383, 390, 402, 420, 430, 440, 443, 450, 460
       SW 260, 311, 367


  •  
    B.A.  in Social Work (515)   

    University Requirements

    Religion Requirements

    (Book of Mormon Courses)
    Take these Courses   
    REL 121, 122
     
           OR
              Take these Courses   
              REL 121H, 122H
     
                     OR
                        Take this Course   
                        REL 221

    AND
    (Scripture Based Courses)
    Take 6 Credits   
    REL 211, 212, 301, 302, 324
     
           OR
              Take 6 Credits   
              REL 211H, 212H, 301H, 302H, 324H

    AND
    (Other Religion Courses)
    Take 4 Credits   
    REL 100, 130, 215, 234, 235, 260, 261, 264, 333, 341, 341H, 342, 342H, 351, 352, 370, 431, 471, 475

    Online Learning

    Each student is required to take at least one online course. For more information about the online requirement please visit the Online Learning section found in the Graduation & Transfer section of the catalog or visit http://web.byui.edu/Catalog/2005-2006/generalEducation.htm.

    Other online course information is available at http://www2.byui.edu/insttech/online.htm. A list of online courses is available at http://www2.byui.edu/insttech/OnlineCourses/onlinecalendar.htm (select a semester or term).

    GE Requirements

    (Eng. 315 is Recommended to fill the Reading and Writing requirement)

    I. Reading and Writing

       Take 1 Course
       ENG 111, 111C, 111H

    AND
       Take 1 Course
       ENG 311, 311C, 311H, 315, 315C, 316, 316C  

    II. Mathematics
  • Math 101 may be used as meeting the Math General Education requirement if all of the following criteria are met: 1)Student was enrolled and completed Math 101 prior to Fall 2001; 2)The student's major does not require math class; 3)There is no break in enrollment.
  • Students initiating their studies at BYU-Idaho Fall Semester 2001 or later are not eligible for the ACT math waiver and must take one of the following courses to fill the math requirement.

       Take 1 Course
       MATH 221  

    III. Arts

       Take 1 Course
       ART 101, 160, 201, 202
       HFED 140
       HORT 230
       HUM 101, 101H, 201, 201H, 202, 202H
       MUSIC 100, 101
       TA 115, 117

    AND
       Take this Course
       FA 100

    IV. Biological Science and Physical Science

       Take 4 Credits
       BIO 230, 264  

    V. American Institutions

       Take 1 Course
       AMHER 170, 170H
       ECON 111, 111H
       HIST 120, 121
       POLSC 110

    IX. Social Science
    This course must be in a different discipline from the course taken to fill the American Institutions requirement.

       Take 1 Course
       SOC 111, 111H, 112, 112H  

    VII. Foreign Language
    Take 8 credits of language study and 3 credits of literature all in the same language.

       Take 11 Credits
       CHIN 101, 101H, 102, 201, 347
       FR 102, 201, 202
       GER 102, 201, 202
       RUSS 101, 101H, 102, 201, 340, 340H
       SPAN 102, 201, 201M, 202, 302

    Major Requirements
    No double counting of Major courses

       Take these Courses
       HS 460
       PSYCH 342
       SW 260, 311, 340, 362, 364, 365, 367, 400, 463, 464, 465, 466, 470

    AND
       Take 1 Course
       PSYCH 111, 111H

    AND
       Take 1 Course
       CHILD 320
       SOC 383

    AND

       Repeat 2 times
       SW 497R

    AND
       Repeat 2 times
       SW 498R

    AND
       Take 9 Credits
       CHILD 210, 210H, 330, 440
       COMM 150, 150H, 350
       FAML 360, 460
       HS 280, 351
       IS 140
       PSYCH 201, 201H, 235
       RL 320, 370
       SIGN 101, 102
       SOC 111, 111H, 112, 112H, 210, 300, 301, 323, 330, 357, 360, 365, 370, 390, 420, 440, 443, 450, 460


  •  
    B.A.  in Sociology (785)   

    University Requirements

    Religion Requirements

    (Book of Mormon Courses)
    Take these Courses   
    REL 121, 122
     
           OR
              Take these Courses   
              REL 121H, 122H
     
                     OR
                        Take this Course   
                        REL 221

    AND
    (Scripture Based Courses)
    Take 6 Credits   
    REL 211, 212, 301, 302, 324
     
           OR
              Take 6 Credits   
              REL 211H, 212H, 301H, 302H, 324H

    AND
    (Other Religion Courses)
    Take 4 Credits   
    REL 100, 130, 215, 234, 235, 260, 261, 264, 333, 341, 341H, 342, 342H, 351, 352, 370, 431, 471, 475

    Online Learning

    Each student is required to take at least one online course. For more information about the online requirement please visit the Online Learning section found in the Graduation & Transfer section of the catalog or visit http://web.byui.edu/Catalog/2005-2006/generalEducation.htm.

    Other online course information is available at http://www2.byui.edu/insttech/online.htm. A list of online courses is available at http://www2.byui.edu/insttech/OnlineCourses/onlinecalendar.htm (select a semester or term).

    GE Requirements
    I. Reading and Writing

       Take 1 Course
       ENG 111, 111C, 111H

    AND
       Take 1 Course
       ENG 311, 311C, 311H, 312, 312C, 313, 313C, 314, 315, 315C, 316, 316C
       HIST 300

    II. Mathematics

  • Math 101 may be used as meeting the Math General Education requirement if all of the following criteria are met: 1)Student was enrolled and completed Math 101 prior to Fall 2001; 2)The student's major does not require math class; 3)There is no break in enrollment.
  • Students initiating their studies at BYU-Idaho Fall Semester 2001 or later are not eligible for the ACT math waiver and must take one of the following courses to fill the math requirement.

       Take 1 Course
       MATH 221  

    III. Arts

       Take 1 Course
       ART 101, 160, 201, 202
       HFED 140
       HORT 230
       HUM 101, 101H, 201, 201H, 202, 202H
       MUSIC 100, 101
       TA 115, 117

    AND
       Take this Course
       FA 100

    IV. Biological Science and Physical Science

       Take 4 Credits
       AGRON 122, 270
       BIO 100, 100H, 102, 102H, 118, 120, 130, 150, 150L, 176, 200, 202, 208, 221, 222, 230, 250, 264, 265, 268

              OR
                 Take 4 Credits
                 CHEM 100, 101, 105, 105H, 106, 106H
                 GEOG 101, 101L
                 GEOL 101, 102, 103, 103L, 104, 110, 110L, 111, 111L
                 PH 101, 102, 105, 116, 121, 127, 150
                 PH.S 100, 100L, 110

    V. American Institutions

       Take 1 Course
       AMHER 170, 170H
       ECON 111, 111H
       HIST 120, 121
       POLSC 110

    IX. Social Science
    This course must be in a different discipline from the course taken to fill the American Institutions requirement.

       Take 1 Course
       SOC 111, 111H  

    VII. Foreign Language
    Take 8 credits of language study and 3 credits of literature all in the same language.

       Take 11 Credits
       CHIN 101, 101H, 102, 201, 347
       FR 102, 201, 202
       GER 102, 201, 202
       RUSS 101, 101H, 102, 201, 340, 340H
       SPAN 102, 201, 201M, 202, 302

    Major Requirements
    No double counting of Major courses

       Take these Courses
       SOC 293, 303, 323, 340, 370

    AND
       Take 1 Course
       SOC 112, 112H

    AND
       Take 1 Course
       SOC 495, 498

    AND

    (Soc 311 & SW 311 are the same course)
       Take these Courses
       ANTH 101, 101H
       CHILD 210, 210H
       HS 360
       POLSC 280, 311
       PSYCH 111, 111H, 342, 350
       SOC 120, 204, 205, 206, 301, 303, 311, 330, 357, 360, 365, 383, 390, 402, 420, 430, 440, 443, 450, 460
       SW 260, 311, 367



  • Minor in  Sociology (129)   
    No double counting of minor courses
    Take 1 Course   
    SOC 111, 111H

    AND
    Take 1 Course   
    SOC 112, 112H

    AND
    Take 5 Courses   
    ANTH 101, 101H
    PSYCH 350
    SOC 120, 204, 205, 206, 207, 210, 300, 301, 303, 311, 323, 330, 340, 357, 360, 365, 370, 383, 390, 402, 420, 430, 440, 443, 450, 460
    SW 260
     
    Course Descriptions

    ANTH 101 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3:3:0)
    Fulfills GE Social Science requirement.
    Anthropological approaches and perspectives on humans, their culture, and their society; early and prehistoric humans. Basic concepts for analyzing cultural behavior. Comparison on non Western with Western societies.
    (Winter, Summer, Fall)
     
    ANTH 290R Special Topics in Anthropology (1-4:0:0)
    The department will determine special areas of study that will benefit the anthropology students in giving them additional preparation related to the field.
    (On demand)
     
    SOC 111 Introduction to Sociology (3:3:0)
    Fulfills GE Social Science requirement.
    This course focuses on the social and cultural foundations of human life. Its basic concepts enable the students to appreciate the degree to which they and others are molded and shaped by society, and to understand the complexity of the social forces in their environment.
    (Winter, Summer, Fall)
     
    SOC 112 Social Problems (3:3:0)
    Fulfills GE Social Science requirement.
    This course is designed to acquaint the student with current social problems and suggests possible means of prevention and/or solution.
    (Winter, Summer, Fall)
     
    SOC 120 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3:3:0)
    The philosophy and history of criminal justice, overview of crime and police problems; organization and functions of law enforcement, courts, probation, pardon and parole. Survey of professional career opportunities and qualifications required.
    (Winter, Fall)
     
    SOC 203 Campus Officer Training (2:2:0)
    This course provides students with a basic understanding of essential job duties and functions of campus officers. The course is outlined by the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators. A certificate of completion is issued.
    (Winter)
     
    SOC 204 Reserve Officer Training (4:3:1)
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into Reserve Acadamy
    This course is to give credit to students taking the Reserve Academy as a requirement for employment with Campus Police.
    (Fall)
     
    SOC 205 Criminal Investigations (3:3:0)
    Techniques and practices of criminal investigation, scientific crime detection, interview and interrogation techniques, laws of arrest, search and seizure, crime scene search, evidence collection and preservations.
    (Winter, Fall odd years)
     
    SOC 206 Police in American Society (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Intro to Criminology is suggested.
    Role of Law Enforcement in our society. Analysis of police procedures and practices.
    (Winter, Fall even years)
     
    SOC 207 Wildlife Law and Enforcement (3:3:0)
    In depth analysis of legal mandates, (Federal & State) from a resource protection paradigm. Review of environmental law and evidence collection in relation to the atmosphere associated with the judicial system. Description of field techniques for evidence collection, case investigation and arrest.
    (Winter)
     
    SOC 290R Special topics in Criminal Justice (1-4:0:0)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    The department will determine special areas of study that will benefit criminal justice students in giving them additional preparation related to the field. Term of enrollment, credit and other details will be arranged by the department and the instructor.
    (On demand)
     
    SOC 293 Applied Sociology Seminar (1:1:0)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the sociology major and provide them professional preparation for continuing scholarship and careers.
    (Winter, Fall)
     
    SOC 298 Internship in Criminal Justice (1-4:0:0)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    To provide students with an exposure to the world of work in an active justice agency.
    (On demand)
     
    SOC 300 Sociological Theory (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Soc 111 and 112
    Survey and appraisal of major schools of sociological thought at present, with an examination of areas of change and controversy emphasizing recent significant sociological contributions.
    (Winter, Fall)
     
    SOC 301 Administration of Justice (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Completion or current enrollment in English 315. Introductory courses should have been taken before this course.
    Purpose, function, and history of the courts, dealing with the administration of justice. A seminar approach will be used.
    (Winter, Fall even years)
     
    SOC 303 Criminal Procedures (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Introductory courses should have been completed before enrollment.
    This course examines case law as it relates to constitutional liberties or court police procedures.
    (Winter, Fall even years)
     
    SOC 311 Family Interaction (3:3:0)
    Traces the historical development of the modern American family and, using major sociological theoretical perspectives, examines the impact of society upon the family and the major elements of family life.
    (Winter, Summer, Fall)
     
    SOC 323 Race and Ethnic Relations (3:3:0)
    This course considers historic as well as present day relationships of racial and ethnic groups. The students analyze prejudices and discriminatory practices, their causes and influences.
    (Winter, Summer, Fall)
     
    SOC 330 Criminology (3:3:0)
    A study of crime and its causation with an overview of the crime problem from a theoretical approach.
    (Winter, Fall odd years, Summer even years)
     
    SOC 340 Research Methods (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor, Math 221
    Qualitative and quantitative designs. Problem formulation, data collection, analysis, writing, and presenting results.
    (Winter, Summer, Fall)
     
    SOC 357 Human Relations and Leadership (3:3:0)
    The basic knowledge and skills necessary to lead and participate effectively in small groups are presented. Leadership skills are enhanced through understanding self, interpersonal relations and small groups. Students are expected to participate in small group experiences.
    (Winter, Summer, Fall)
     
    SOC 360 Religion's Impact on Society (3:3:0)
    A study of the major religions in the US and their impact on human behavior.
    (Winter, Fall odd years)
     
    SOC 365 Sociology of Health (3:3:0)
    A survey of the sociology of health, covering topics of: the influence of the social environment on health and illness, health and illness behavior, health care practitioners and their relationships with patients, and the health care system.
    (Fall, Winter odd years)
     
    SOC 370 Social Stratification (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Soc 300
    A sociological approach to the dilemma of power, economic and status differentiations in American society.
    (Winter, Summer, Fall)
     
    SOC 383 Juvenile Delinquency (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Soc 111 or Soc 112 recommended
    The nature, extent, causes, treatment and prevention of delinquency as well as the adjudication process will be considered. Social causes and solutions are emphasized.
    (Winter, Fall)
     
    SOC 390 Population and Environment (3:3:0)
    A basic course in the problems and issues surrounding population and ecology. Global trends in mortality, fertility, and migration as well as the impact of the aging of the population and urbanization will be considered. Also, the major issues of the sociology of the environment will be studied - the impact of dwindling food and energy resources as well as proposed solution to environmental problems.
    (Winter, Fall, even years)
     
    SOC 402 Criminal Law (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Introductory courses should be taken before this course. English 315 should have been completed or be concurrently enrolled.
    Elements of criminal law, analysis of police power, functions of prosecutor and defense, case law and statutory definitions.
    (Winter, Fall)
     
    SOC 420 Drugs and Society (3:3:0)
    This course explores the place drugs have in American Society. It includes society's use of and attitude towards drugs as it explores the history of drugs. The power and influence of drugs, the acceptance and rejection of drugs, an understanding of the classification of drugs, legal responses, and treatment programs for drug abuse are also addressed.
    (Winter, Fall, odd years)
     
    SOC 430 Family and Community Relationships (3:3:0)
    Perspective on providing family-focused early intervention, with emphasis on communicating with families, empowering parents, developing family and professional partnerships, interagency collaboration, and accessing and linking families and community resources.
    (Winter, Fall)
     
    SOC 440 Corrections (3:3:0)
    An overview and critical analysis of contemporary correctional theory and practice. Historical, traditional, innovative, and future aspects of corrections as well as critical issues such as prisoners' rights, death penalty, unions, and institutions, and correctional careers will be discussed.
    (Winter, Fall)
     
    SOC 443 Victimology (3:3:0)
    This course focuses on victims rather than offenders in the justice system.
    (Winter, Fall even years, Summer odd years)
     
    SOC 450 Social Inequalities (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Soc 300
    An examination of social inequality in the United States and comparisons to other countries. Focus on the sources of consequences of inequality for both individuals and social institutions.
    (Winter, Fall, odd years)
     
    SOC 460 Community Studies (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Soc 300
    The changing nature of social life as it has moved from predominantly rural to urban patterns. Significant events that have led to urbanization.
    (Winter, Fall, even years and every Summer)
     
    SOC 490R Special Topics in Sociology (1-3:3:0)
    The department will determine special areas of study that will benefit the Sociology students in giving them additional preparation related to the field. Term of enrollment, credit and other details will be arranged by the department and the instructor.
    (On demand)
     
    SOC 495 Senior Research in Sociology (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor Should be a 1st or 2nd semester senior majoring in Sociology.
    Individual studies of topics under the direction of a faculty member.
    (Winter, Summer, Fall)
     
    SOC 498 Senior Internship in Sociology (1-4:0:0)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor Should be a 1st or 2nd semester senior majoring in Sociology.
    This course will give students work experience in areas of sociology and criminology.
    (Winter, Summer, Fall)
     
    SW 260 Introduction to Social Work (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: none
    Social Welfare as a social institution and the emergence of social work as a profession. An overview of historical underpinnings to develop social work knowledge, historically grounded purposes, and fundamental values and ethics for generalist practice.
    (Winter, Summer, Fall)
     
    SW 311 Family Interaction (3:3:0)
    Traces the historical development of the modern American family and, using major sociological/social work theoretical perspectives, examines the impact of society upon the family and the major elements of family life.
    (Winter, Summer, Fall)
     
    SW 340 Social Work Research Methods (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor, Math 221
    Qualitative and quantitative research designs. Problems formulation, data collection, statistical analysis, writing, and presenting results. Knowledge is used to assess and apply qualitative, empirical related research and technology to social work generalist practice. Practical uses for research, to inform policy, promote social change, improve clinical work, and enhance program delivery.
    (Winter, Summer, Fall)
     
    SW 362 Social Work Practice 1-Individuals (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Admission to SW program
    To introduce, explore, and blend knowledge, values, ethics, and skills used by social workers. Social Work practice using the generalist method i.e. relationship identifying issues, problems, resources, assessment, intervention, evaluation, and termination with a diverse client population.
    (Winter, Fall)
     
    SW 364 Social Work Practice II-Group (3:0:0)
    Prerequisite: SW 362, 367
    Knowlege, value, skills, and ethics as applied to small group work social work practice; identify and understand group dynamics. Application of the generalist method to group work.
    (Winter, Fall)
     
    SW 365 Social Work Practice III-Community/Macro (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: SW 362, SW 364
    This class prepares students with knowledge, values, skills, and ethics for macro level generalist social work practice. Topics include community, bureaucracy, social planning, social action, and locality organization development.
    (Winter, Fall)
     
    SW 367 Human Behavior in Social Environment (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Admission to SW program
    This course introduces social work's perspective on human behavior and the social environment. A social systems approach is used to focus on the bio-psycho-social context of human development. Relationships between life-span issues and the understanding of person-environment transactions and use of the generalist social work method with individuals, families, groups, organizations, communities, culture, and society are all areas of study.
    (Winter, Summer, Fall)
     
    SW 400 Social Work Values & Ethics (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Admission to SW program
    An overview of values and principles of ethical decision making for social workers using the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics as a backdrop. Students will have the opportunity to become aware of personal values, the values of the social work profession, and to discuss various ethical dilemmas and their effect on agencies, clients, and social work practice. Students will learn that social work values and ethics are woven into the fabric of generalist social work pratice with all populations.
    (Winter, Fall)
     
    SW 463 Child Welfare Services (3:0:0)
    Prerequisite: Admission to SW program
    This course is planned and organized to acquaint students with the role of the generalist social work practitioner in the field of child welfare. An overview of public and private programs that provide services to children is provided. These services include counseling, adoptions, foster care, residential care, school-based services, home-based services, court services, and daycare services. Also addressed are social problems that impact children, particularly thosewho are disadvantaged because of disability, racism, sexism and poverty.
    (Winter, Summer even years, Fall)
     
    SW 464 Intervention Diverse Clients (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Admission to SW program
    This class is to develop competency for generalist social work practice with diverse clients. This includes improving self-awareness, gaining knowledge of racial/ethnic groups, and conducting multi-level social work practice based on client cultural reality.
    (Winter, Summer odd years, Fall)
     
    SW 465 Social Work in Community Mental Health (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Admission to SW program, Psych 342
    This course studies the bio-psycho-social aspects of emotional maladjustments. The history of community mental health will be studied as well as various aspects of assessment, social causations, treatments and preventions of mental illness. Using the generalist social work method the role of the baccalaureate social worker in community and behavioral mental health is explored.
    (Winter, Fall)
     
    SW 466 Social Welfare Policy (3:0:0)
    Prerequisite: Admission to SW program
    Social legislation processes, analysis of social policy, and the knowledge available to social workers for involvement in social planning and policy change. The role of social policy in service delivery and generalist social work practice.



    (Winter, Summer odd years, Fall)
     
    SW 470 Populations at Risk (3:3:0)
    Prerequisite: Admission to SW program, SW 362, SW 364, SW 365
    An overview of special risk populations and use of generalist social work skills and methods to address their needs. The role of the social worker in risk assessment, obtaining resources, interventions, and evaluations of these special populations. Topics may include children, single parent families, developmental disability, low income families, minority groups, gender issues, juvenile delinquency, unemployement, and various types of disability or delay. A strengths perspective to promote individual, group, societal, and economic and social justice will be discussed.
    (Winter, Fall)
     
    SW 490R Special Topics (1-3:0:0)
    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    The department will determine special areas of study that will benefit social work students in giving them additional preparation related to the field. Term of enrollment, credit and other details will be arranged by the department and the instructor.
    (On demand)
     
    SW 497R Social Work Senior Internship Seminar (2:2:0)
    Prerequisite: Social work major, senior class standing. SW 362, SW 364, SW 365, SW 367, SW 400, and permission of instructor.
    The goal is to integrate academic knowledge with actual experience (empirical and practice based knowledge). This experience will help the student to reinforce identification with the purposes, values, and ethics of the Social Work profession, promote professional competence, and focus on generalist social work education. Students will be evaluated on the basis of consistency with program objectives.
    (Winter, Summer, Fall)
     
    SW 498R Social Work Senior Internship/Practicum (3:2:0)
    Prerequisite: Social work major, senior class standing. SW 362, SW 364, SW 365, SW 367, SW 400, and permission of instructor.
    Supervised field experience in a social service agency. Supervision by a social worker. Experience and application of generalist social work knowledge, values, practice skills in actual field experience settings. The culmination experience in which students demonstrate achievement of the BYU-Idaho social work program objectives.
    (Winter, Summer, Fall)